Community College Completion Paradox Panel Discussion

Join panelists Dr. Shanna Smith Jaggars, Dr. Hans Johnson, and Dr. Peter Shea in a discussion about community college completion. Moderated by Jeff Young, Editor-in-Chief of Inside Higher Ed, panelists will provide an overview of the  area of research they are currently most involved in, and how their work may help translate knowledge into practice.  The panel will conclude with a question and answer session.

 

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Speaker Bio

Moderated by Chronicle of Higher Education Editor Jeff Young with Guest Panelists Dr. Shanna Smith Jaggars, Dr. Hans Johnson, and Dr. Peter Shea.

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Shanna Smith Jaggars is Director of Student Success Research for the Office of Distance Education and E-Learning at The Ohio State University in Columbus, where her research focuses on improving student outcomes, including issues around technology-enabled learning, online and distance learning, online student support services, curricular and transfer pathways, and other topics related to access, affordability, and time to degree.

At CCRC, Jaggars leads the Computer Science Pathways project and the American Honors study. Jaggars served as CCRC Assistant Director from 2012 to 2016. Together with Thomas Bailey and Davis Jenkins, she is the author of Redesigning America’s Community Colleges: A Clearer Path to Student Success(Harvard University Press, 2015).

Jaggars received her doctorate in 2002 from the University of Texas at Austin in human development and family science, where she focused on the methodological and statistical issues inherent in the analysis of individual and dyadic change across time. Prior to joining CCRC in 2008, Jaggars ran the statistical consulting unit at the University of Texas at Austin, where she collaborated on studies involving information technology usage in the postsecondary setting, the mental and physical health of college students, and a range of other topics.

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Jeffrey R. Young is an editor and writer focused on technology issues and the future of education.

He is currently a senior editor at The Chronicle of Higher Education leading a team exploring new story formats. He is also an adjunct professor of journalism at the University of Maryland at College Park, teaching a course on multimedia storytelling.

Last year he spent a year as a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where he was also a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

Young has written for national publications including The New York Times, New Scientist, Slate, and The Wall Street Journal. An article he wrote was selected for the anthology The Best of Technology Writing 2007.

He joined The Chronicle in 1995, and has previously led the paper’s Students section, focusing on issues of college admissions and student life. In 2007, Young took a yearlong break from writing to become The Chronicle’s first Web editor, helping start blogs, podcasts, and multimedia features. In 2010 he took a month-long reporting trip to Asia, filing dispatches from China, India, Singapore, and South Korea.

Young is a frequent speaker on issues of education and technology, having given talks at the South-by-Southwest Interactive conference, at education events, and on campuses. He received a bachelor’s degree in English from Princeton University in 1995 and a master’s in communication, culture, and technology from Georgetown University in 2001.

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Hans Johnson is director of the PPIC Higher Education Center and a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California. As center director, he works with a team of researchers to identify policies that can make higher educa­tion policy more successful and sustainable. His own research focuses on improving college access and completion. He frequently presents his work to policymakers and higher education officials, and he serves as a technical advisor to many organizations seeking to improve college graduation rates, address workforce needs, and engage in long-term capacity planning. His other areas of expertise include international and domestic migration, housing in California, and population projections. Previously, he served as research director at PPIC. Before joining PPIC, he worked as a demographer at the California Research Bureau and at the California Department of Finance. He holds a PhD in demography and a master’s degree in biostatistics from the University of California, Berkeley.