Flipped Learning: from A to Z

Concurrent Session 3

Session Materials

Brief Abstract

Reversing lecture and homework elements and integrating engaged-learning activities can completely change classroom dynamics and personalize the learning experience. Student attendance, engagement, and understanding will sharply increase. Come explore the possibilities and leave with a personalized implementation plan and a variety of interactive engagement activities that can be implemented immediately.

Presenters

Erik Christensen holds engineering degrees from the U.S. Naval Academy and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He teaches physics, astronomy, and astrobiology at South Florida State College and online for Florida Keys Community College. Erik has been flipping his classes since 2013 and has seen monumental increases in student engagement and successes. Erik regularly presents on his creative approaches to teaching at the SACSCOC Annual Meeting and Summer Institute, Online Learning Consortium (OLC) Accelerate, STEMtech, SXSWedu, D2L Fusion, Connexions, Florida Educational Technology Conference (FETC), Association of Florida Colleges (AFC), and Cosmos in the Classroom.

Extended Abstract

  • Relevance

The predominate teaching model in use worldwide, from pre-kindergarten through graduate school, had its beginnings in 18th-century Prussia. The concept of a “sage on the stage” standing and delivering a lecture to a captive audience was intended to ensure complete control by the presenter. In the past decade, the efficacy of this approach has been questioned and newer, technology-enabled models have quietly transformed the learning environment by providing a more personalized and effective learning experience. The flipped classroom is one of these new approaches.

The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the traditional lecture and homework elements are reversed. Pre-recorded video lectures are viewed before class. In-class time is re-purposed so students can inquire about lecture content, apply their knowledge, and collaboratively interact in hands-on activities. This is a role change; instructors give up their front-of-the-class position in favor of a more collaborative and cooperative contribution and students are held more responsible for their own learning. Flipping the classroom energizes the classroom experience and moves the learning timeline forward so it starts before class, provides optimum student support from both peers and the instructor during class, and prolongs meaningful student engagement after class. As a result, student success skyrockets.

The flipped learning model is significant for higher education as it provides a pathway to a learner-centered classroom environment, enabling deeper learning (Bergmann & Sams, 2012) that today’s educators are seeking. Gojak (2012) noted that educators should not ask if they should flip their class but instead should ask how can they use the tenants of this model to become more effective and increase their students’ conceptual understanding. Just a few years ago, flipped learning was predominately at the secondary level. Recent surveys (FLN, 2014) report that 27% of higher education educators have flipped at least one class. Of those who have flipped a class, 96% say they would recommend this model to their colleagues. Clearly, flipped learning is energizing the entire learning process and providing a pathway to student success.

  • Engaging the Participants

This workshop will present a highly successful model for flipped learning and then walk participants through each stage (before class, during class, and after class) discussing strategies and tools as well as showing examples that have been proven in the classroom. Throughout each stage, at approximately ten minute intervals, an active engagement activity will be embedded both as a means of engaging participants and getting them to reflect upon the material as it is introduced and interface with other participants but also to showcase activities they could adapt for use in their classroom. These will include:

  • An online backchannel (e.g., todaysmeet.com) will be established enabling participants to engage one another virtually during the session and post comments and questions. Throughout the workshop, this will be reviewed and questions posted will be addressed.
  • Name Tent Plus – creative way to get to know your students quickly and for them to feel comfortable asking questions.
  • Self-Reflection – ask participants how they would grade the current level of active engagement in their classes and how they could improve.
  • Five-Word Exercise – collaborative exercise that asks participants to describe a photo in five words and then have a partner explain how the word applies.
  • Sole Mate – Find another participant with shoes having the same type of soles and share with them.
  • Whip Around – Go around the room and ask every participant to comment on what they have just learned.
  • Popcorn – a free-form way to get quick feedback. Ask participants to “pop” up and shout out what they think about a certain topic.
  • One-Minute Paper – spend one minute continuously writing your thoughts or concerns about a topic.
  • One-Minute Conversation – pair up with someone and talk for one minute. Then have other person summarize that in 30 seconds. Then reverse roles.
  • PhotoVoice – Describe how a certain photo applies to the topic being discussed.
  • 20-20 Reflection – In 20 words or less explain…. Then, in 20 words or more explain your thoughts/concerns on….
  • Concept Map – given a specific topic, describe four aspects of it; definition, example, illustration, and challenges.
  • 45-second Rendezvous - pair up with another participant and verbally share for 45 seconds something you just learned and would like to try out when they return to your institution.
  • 3-2-1 Reflective Summary – At the end of the workshop, each participant will be asked to reflect on the session and then write down three things that they learned, two things they want to learn more about, and one thing they can’t wait to share with someone.

Additionally, all participants will be asked to develop their own Personalized Implementation Plan which will help them outline how they might approach flipping a class upon return to their institution.

  • Intended Participant Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this presentation, session participants will be able to:

  • Describe the flipped learning model and be able to identify at least three potential benefits this model has over conventionally-taught classes in helping students become more successful.

  • Identify at least five strategies/tools that can be used to promote active engagement with students.

  • Have the confidence to implement the flipped model in their classroom.

  • Develop a personal plan to flip their classroom - whether a single class session, a complete chapter, or an entire course.

  • Have a variety of references and resources related to the flipped classroom model that they can review and use at their own institution.

  • Schedule of Activities

Introductions..................................................................... 5 min

What is Flipped Learning?.................................................25 min

Before Class Activities......................................................25 min

During Class Activities......................................................25 min

Break.............................................................................. 15 min

After Class Activities........................................................25 min

Recommendations.............................................................15 min

Flipped Learning Resources...............................................15 min

Personalized Implementation Plan Development..................15 min

Q&A............................................................................... 15 min

Total..............................................................................  3 hours

  • References

Bergmann, J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. International Society for Technology in Education.

Flipped Learning Network and SOPHIA (2014). Growth in flipped learning: Transitioning the focus from teachers to students for educational success.

Gojak, L. (2012, October). To Flip or Not to Flip: That is Not the Question! National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.