OERs & Skills for Student Success: Academic Integrity & Financial Literacy MOOCs

Concurrent Session 2

Brief Abstract

University of Maryland, Baltimore County developed two online, self-paced internal MOOCs for undergraduate students focusing on core academic and life skills. Both tutorials are intended to support students to make effective choices about ethical scholarship and financial decisions. This presentation will review the background, design and development, usage, and next steps.

Presenters

As eLearning Manager, Dr. Mariann Hawken oversees several Blackboard applications at University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and provides support for faculty course development activities. With more than 20 years of experience in educational technology, Mariann is a Blackboard MVP and a certified Peer Reviewer with Quality Matters. Past activities include distance education policy development and comprehensive faculty training programs for online/hybrid course redesign.
Holly Owens is an Instructional Technology Specialist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). Holly started her education career as a K-12 educator and her love for technology led her into her current role as an Instructional Technology Specialist in higher education. She is the team’s clicker expert and also coordinates training opportunities for UMBC faculty and staff. Holly serves as the secondary point of contact for Blackboard administrative tasks. Holly has an M.Ed. in Instructional Technology and a Masters in Distance Education. Holly has a passion for online course design and helping others gain their 'tech confidence.'

Extended Abstract

University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) developed two online, self-paced internal MOOCs for undergraduate students focusing on core academic and life skills. Both tutorials are intended to support students to make effective choices about ethical scholarship and financial decisions. This presentation will review the background, design and development, usage, and next steps.

Academic integrity is a core value at UMBC. By enrolling in a course, each student assumes the responsibilities of an active participant in the scholarly community in which everyone’s academic work and behavior are held to the highest standards of honesty. The academic integrity course originated as a 10-year old, text-dense tutorial for graduate students with minimal, fixed assessments and no consideration for diverse learning styles. Students did not receive a certificate and the tracking mechanism was extremely clumsy. While evaluating the tutorial for use with undergraduate students, the campus Academic Conduct Committee identified several Open Education Resources and Creative Commons licensed materials to develop a new tutorial for students. The revised course reflected a contemporary context, incorporated multimedia and engaging content, and effectively used LMS and LTI tools. The academic integrity MOOC is in its pilot phase with more than 2,000 students expected to enroll.

The financial literacy course was developed from a HigherOne grant. The goal of this program is to provide comprehensive financial education to UMBC students, faculty and staff. The course provides a collection of informative resources regarding student finances. While much is offered within the context of attending college, these resources are useful beyond the classroom and help better prepare our students to master their financial matters after graduation. The financial literacy course contains content provided by CashCourse.org. Originally, resources available for students pertaining to financial literacy were available throughout various websites at the university, including financialsmarts.umbc.edu. This made it challenging to track student progress when it came to gaining the financial knowledge and skills they need to survive in the “real” financial world. The Financial Literacy Committee at UMBC proposed that students should access to this  information via one medium, a Blackboard course. Thus the Blackboard “Cash Course” was born. Participants were offered two incentives upon completion of course requirements, one was receiving a financial literacy badge, and the other was having their name entered into a drawing for an iPad.  

These MOOCs were originally developed using Blackboard and are in revision stages to incorporate CourseArc for interactive opportunities such as flash cards, matching, self-check questions, and other engaging content. Adaptive release is used to control content delivery to ensure students complete modules and lessons in a specific order. These MOOCs also use badges to award a certificates to students, which will be later pushed to the myUMBC portal and to Credly as part of a campus-wide initiative for micro-credentialing.

This session is ideal for faculty and staff who support student life skills. Participants attending this session will learn about managing large numbers of participants in an LMS as well as effective practices for incorporating Open Educational Resources (OER) and using Creative Commons licensing to develop course content. Slides and web resources will be posted on the conference website and shared during the session. The speakers will use web-based response systems to poll the audience with multiple types of questions including open-ended feedback.