Synchronous Video Chat: Solving the Interactivity Vacuum in Online Education

Concurrent Session 8

Brief Abstract

Leaders and innovators in online learning explore the use of video far beyond a static one way communication. From Video Chat to  Live Streaming video is becoming a dynaic new form of communication and collaboration.

Presenters

Amy is the Assistant Director of Faculty Support, for the School of Life Sciences (SoLS). Her responsibilities include managing the TeachTech Lab, a "makerspace" for faculty and instructors to learn, share and collaborate with innovative technologies for their face-to-face, hybrid, and fully online classes. Amy develops training and workshops, and helps faculty integrate “best practices” for implementing active learning in their courses. She is currently teaching EDT180 for Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. Most recently Amy has been involved with the use of virtual reality for online lab classes, and developing the new online biology degree. Amy’s graduate work included studies in elearning, adult learning and faculty development in higher education. Her thesis focused on specialized training to prepare adjunct college professors to be effective in their classrooms. Amy has presented at various conferences, including Educause, The Teaching Professor, and the Online Learning Consortium. She is the Assistant Director for the Emerging Learning Design community and conference.

Extended Abstract

Video in the classroom  is moving  rapidly beyond a one-way medium. The next generatio of students , digital natives, have fluency in Vine, Periscope, Snapchat, etc., and are communicating with video and other forms of media at levels far beyond the basic concept of video. New platforms are interactive and engaging in a one to many and many to many form. As learning management systems move into the cloud and provide more opportunities for integration, video can finally engage everyone in a media-savvy way that recreates the dynamics of a traditional classroom in a virtual learning enviroment.

Benjamin Franklin once said, “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” While asynchronous video is a prominent method of delivery course content to students it does not enage them in the exchange of ideas it is a one way method of communication and learning. For auto-dydacs this is completely sufficient for the remaing 90% of students who rely on collaboration, peer guidance and interaction this is not an appropiate method for learning.

Bryan Alexander, futurist and an early pioneer in MOOCs, and Jonathan Blake Huer, an innovator in video production and learning implmentation, will review leading tools and technologies that are helping educators engage their students and deliver theier their course content through video.