Using videos as an alternative to traditional assessment to enhance student learning and engagement in Large classroom

Concurrent Session 9

Brief Abstract

In this session, I will share my experience as an Instructional Technologist working with faculty and students in a large classrooms using free and easy-to-use software to produce and upload videos as assessments. This session will benefit both students and instructors to know how to produce videos (students) and assess video submissions (instructors) in large classrooms.

Presenters

Guieswende Rouamba works at the Notre Dame Center for Studies of Languages and Cultures to promote technology and guide language faculty on how to incorporate technology into teaching. He was an Instructional Design Technology Specialist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL). Prior to joining the Innovative Instructional Design team at UNL, he worked for West Virginia University Academic Innovation to develop interactive digital math content for high school engineering courses. Currently, he is a PhD candidate in Instructional Technology. His primary research interests are developing online and blended courses
Nathalie H. Rouamba is a Ph.D. candidate in Education with a specialization in Curriculum, Literacy, and Cultural Studies at West Virginia University.

Extended Abstract

Many studies have applauded the use of videos to enhance students learning, engagement, motivation, and interest (Buzzetto-More, 2014; Desmet, 2009; Zydney & Grincewicz, 2011). Instructional videos are continuing to expand on sites such as YouTube and Khan Academy. Instructors are also producing a great deal of educational videos for online courses and MOOCs.

Although there is an increase in instructor-produced videos, there is a gap in student-produced videos, especially for assessments. Generally, students take more traditional types of assessments such as multiple-choice exams, written papers, presentations, and oral assessments. Student-produced videos as an assessment can be a more innovative way to supplement traditional assessments and has great benefits for students. Video assessments can capture other skills that are not usually captured by written assessments and are a more engaging alternative.

But just asking students to produce videos for grading can be overwhelming, stressful and challenging for most students. For instructors teaching large classes (over 100 students), additional challenges exist: classroom enrollment size, technology choices, video length, and grading options.

In this session, I will share my experience as an Instructional Design Technology Specialist working with faculty and students in a large lecture class using free and easy-to-use software to produce and upload videos as assessments. I will cover the software used, video formats and hosting platforms, grading rubrics, learning management system integration, and cloud-storage solutions for student video hosting and sharing. This session will benefit both students and instructors to know how to produce videos (students) and assess video submissions (instructors) in large classrooms.

 

References

Buzzetto-More, N. A. (2014). An examination of undergraduate student's perceptions and predilections of the use of YouTube in the teaching and learning process. Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects10(1), 17-32.

Desmet, C. (2009). Teaching Shakespeare with YouTube. English Journal, 65-70.

Zydney, J. M., & Grincewicz, A. (2011). The use of video cases in a multimedia learning environment for facilitating high school students’ inquiry into a problem from varying perspectives. Journal of Science Education and Technology20(6), 715-728.