Electronic Health Information Technology: Design and Development of a Simulation-based Instructional Module for Students in an Inter-professional Team-based Learning Environment

Concurrent Session 6

Brief Abstract

Lack of adequate instructional interventions constitutes one of the major reasons behind the problem of increased medical errors and mortality in delivery of healthcare. The goal is to design, develop, and pilot test a simulation-based instructional module on meaningful use of electronic health records based on Guided Experiential Learning theory.

Extended Abstract

Background

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act dedicated $29 billion for an incentive program to help in the high adoption and diffusion of electronic health record (EHR) technology (Blumenthal & Tavenner, 2010). Nevertheless, a troubling issue was discovered that the increased rate of the EHR adoption did not automatically result in the reduction of healthcare costs or enhancements in quality care (Goveia et al., 2013). Additionally, the rising evidence that the use of EHRs could cause accidental medical errors and even impairment or mortality to the patient, is surfacing in the literature (Goveia et al., 2013; Middleton, Bloomrosen, & Dente et al., 2013).

Research Problem

Lack of adequate instructional interventions that address the meaningful use of EHRs constitutes one of the major reasons behind the problem of increased medical errors and mortality in delivery of healthcare (Goveia et al., 2013; Krupa, 2012). Simulations are used often in addressing these types of instructional interventions in healthcare. A common instructional strategy that is used to guide the design of instructional simulations is experiential learning (Carter, Schijven, Aggarwal, Grantcharov, Francis, Hanna, & Jakimowicz, 2006). However, there is minimal guidance on how to design an effective simulation-based instructional module (Anderson, Aylor, Douglas, & Leonard, 2008; Craft, Feldon, Brown, 2013).

Goal

The goal is to design, develop, and pilot test a simulation-based instructional module on meaningful use of EHRs. Clark’s (2004) guided experiential learning (GEL) guidelines will be used to design the module.

Research Questions

The following research questions will guide this investigation: 1. How can GEL be used to design a simulation-based instructional EHR module? 2. What are the reactions of experts to the proposed design and what modifications need to be made prior to implementation? 3. To what extent does a simulation-based EHR module using GEL increase student performance? 4. To what extend does a simulation-based EHR module using GEL influence student satisfaction (i.e., attitude toward strategies, confident to apply content, attitude toward instruction)?

Review of the Literature

The initial review of the literature included the following topics:

  • EHR instructional interventions
  • Simulations in healthcare instruction
  • Simulation design for instruction delivery
  • Experiential learning in healthcare instruction
  • Healthcare interprofessional practice
  • Design and development research

Proposed Methodology

Using a design and development research approach (Richey & Klein, 2007), a simulation-based instructional EHR module will be designed using Clark’s (2004) guidelines for developing instruction using GEL. The design will be validated by an expert panel including medical professionals and instructional designers (Tracey & Richey, 2007). Following validation, the instructional module will be developed and pilot tested with a group of third-year health professions students in an interprofessional team-based learning environment.

Scholarly Significance

The proposed simulation-based instruction should 1) provide guidance for medical educators involved in the design and validation of instructional interventions and 2) improve the knowledge, skills, and attitudes relating to meaningful use of EHRs that are needed to reduce medical errors, and promote quality of patient-centered care under interprofessional team-based practice.