Measuring the Delta: Comparing the Efficacy of Game Based Learning in Pre and Post-Assessments

Concurrent Session 5

Session Materials

Brief Abstract

Comparing valid data from pretests and post-tests, the causality of game based learning becomes evident. In controlled cohort testing, learning deltas for students who participated in GBL are compared to students who did not engage in GBL. The Hypothesis is GBL causes students boost their post-assessment scores. Students without GBL consumption would experience only marginal improvements in their scores.

Sponsored By

Presenters

Former faculty member in communication and college administrator. Currently applying those skills in the teaching and learning discipline of online learning.
Experienced higher education administrator pertaining to Admissions and Academic Advising, particularly with online environments. Currently utilizing these skills to develop, train and enhance the learning and educational experience for both educators and learners via an online platform.

Extended Abstract

Comparing valid data from pretests and post-tests, the causality of game based learning becomes evident. In controlled cohort testing, learning deltas for students who participated in GBL are compared to students who did engage in GBL. The Hypothesis is GBL causes students boost their post-assessment scores. Students without GBL consumption would experience only marginal improvements in their scores. EXTENDED ABSTRACT This presentation will expand the previously seen connection between Game Based Learning and assessment scores. In the learning model, a “Choose Your Adventure” style of game is leveraged, where learners make decisions in scenarios based on the content of the courses and their competencies. Students who participated in GBL scored higher on the post assessment than those who did not. In the first study, pre-Assessment and GBL were not required to complete the course. In the second study, we introduced locked Pre-Assessments, the GBL module, and Post Assessments into undisclosed courses in order to more accurately compare deltas. Students learned through doing as they made their selections. These selections theoretically should be based upon the content they were required to complete in preparation for both the game and the post-assessment. The presentation will highlight two data sets. First, it will show the comparison between users who did use the game and those who did not use the game. Then, the learning delta of those that participated in the step-locked courses compared to those that did not will be reviewed. Hypothesis: users who play through the game learn more. Requiring learners to engage in game based learning will inevitably increase their learning. The presentation has four major parts: 1. Review of the data of student learners. 2. Exploration of the data of student learners and an examination of their success rate both with and without the GBL experience. 3. Exploration of the data of student learners and an examination of their success rate with the Lockstep courses and those without. 4. Examination of conclusions based on the data of the GBL experience and how it impacts the assessment scores by comparing learning deltas. There will be opportunity for discussion about the application of GBL and other areas in which it may be applied. This presentation would benefit an audience that seeks to explore the link between GBL and direct assessment as it pertains to learning objectives. While the presentation seeks to apply itself to higher education, fundamentals can be applied to K-12 as well as other environments where learning/training takes place.