eLearnReady 1 & 2: Let's Prepare Both Students & Faculty for a High Quality Learning Environment

Concurrent Session 5

Session Materials

Brief Abstract

Research on student learning outcomes (SLOs) in higher education online learning environments indicates a number of factors impact student success. This research takes a hands-on, dual-factor approach by addressing concerns on both the student and the faculty side relating to a positive student experience, precipitated by a well-prepared faculty member and course. 

During this session, we will be presenting the eLearnReady Student Readiness tool, which includes a personalized and/or class-based scoring system,  indicating a low, medium, and high range of skills needed to succeed as an online students. A discussion of collected survey data alongside a showcase of the elr tool will be presented, along with a walk-through to the audience of how-to's for free, course-level or campus-wide adoption of this tool may be enacted. Additionally, elr 2.0--which focuses on online faculty readiness characteristics--will be showcased to inform attendees how faculty may individually evaluate their needed improvements in online instructional skills. 

Participants to this session will be provided with details on how to readily adopt both of these free, validated tools into their online courses, programs, and universities, along with a set of related references supporting the research behind the development of these tools. 

Sponsored By

Presenters

Sherri Restauri, Ph.D., Senior Executive Director of the Coastal Office of Online Learning, Coastal Carolina University Sherri currently serves as the Senior Executive Director of the Coastal Office of Online Learning at Coastal Carolina University. She is an Associated Faculty with the Psychology Department at CCU, and specializes in teaching senior-level classes in lifespan psychology, such as Child Development, Adolescent Development, and Gerontology. Sherri has served in academia within the field of online learning for over 20 years in the role of instructional designer, LMS administrator, faculty, and over the last decade plus as a university-level administrator. In addition to her work with Coastal, Sherri also serves the MERLOT organization as the Editor of the Professional Coaching board, as well as an editorial board member and peer reviewer for the Psychology MERLOT board. Her research focuses on methods for improving student success in the academic environment, to include all modalities of learning (online, face-to-face, hybrid, flipped, etc.). She has worked as a consultant for a number of organizations to support the development of online learning initiatives.

Additional Authors

Dr. Lee earned an M.S. degree in Instructional Technology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville in 1999 and a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis on Instructional System Design from the University of Central Florida. Since 2010, he teaches at Coastal Carolina University. Throughout his career of teaching, he developed strong interests in the areas of distance education, mobile learning, interactive multimedia, educational games, and graphic/website design. In his classes, he introduces a wide range of software application and open-source packages to students, allowing them to master computer-based tools used in the design and creation of electronic media, such as electronic images, sounds, videos, text, and motion. - See more at: https://www.coastal.edu/academics/facultyprofiles/education/cheng-yuancoreylee/#sthash.EorTg5Z5.dpuf
Cheryl Fulghum oversees the department of Instructional Design and Online Learning at Haywood Community College in western North Carolina. In this role, she is responsible for instructional design through faculty development, online course design, emerging technologies research, accessibility compliance, and the administrations of several learning platforms. She describes her main role as faculty cheerleader, empowering faculty to become 21st century teachers despite self-identified low-tech skills and fear of the unknown. Prior to her work in the online learning field, she served as full-time faculty in the commercial arts and worked as project manager and media content creator for Shadowbox Design, an educational technology company specializing in online ancillaries for higher education textbook publishers. She has degrees in Broadcast Communications, Journalism, and Educational Media: Curriculum and Instruction.

Extended Abstract

Research on student learning outcomes (SLOs) in higher education online learning environments indicates a number of factors impact student success. This research takes a hands-on, dual-factor approach by addressing concerns on both the student and the faculty side relating to a positive student experience, precipitated by a well-prepared faculty member and course. 

Over a 2 year period, the initial launch and adoption of the eLearnReady Student Readiness tool throughout the country has revealed interesting metrics on student preparedness for learning in the online environment. This tool, which includes a personalized and/or class-based scoring system, provides students with individualized results indicating a low, medium, and high range of skills needed to succeed as an online students. A discussion of collected survey data alongside a showcase of the elr tool will be presented, along with a walk-through to the audience of how-to's for free, course-level or campus-wide adoption of this tool may be enacted. We will also be showcasing the helpful online student preparation tips that were built out to support students indicating needed improvements in online learning skills. 

Additionally, as a follow up to the successful outcomes the researchers have experienced with the implementation of the ElearnReady Student Readiness tool, a second tool, elr 2.0--which focuses on online faculty readiness characteristics--was also developed. The presenters will showcase this new FREE tool that may be adopted individually by faculty or at a college- or campus-wide level by institutions, also showcasing the helpful instructional tips that were built out to support faculty indicating needed improvements in online instructional skills. 

Participants to this session will be provided with details on how to readily adopt both of these free, validated tools into their online courses, programs, and universities, along with a set of related references supporting the research behind the development of these tools.