Instructional Designers as Project Managers - A Phenomenology

Concurrent Session 8

Session Materials

Brief Abstract

Although the need for project management education and experience is reiterated in the literature and in cross-industry job postings, it is unclear how instructional designers acquire and use project management skills and tools in their profession because project management is not a focus in many higher education programs intended to prepare instructional designers. This study investigated the project management-related experiences of practicing instructional designers to gain insight into their common experiences and identify themes from their stories.

Results describe project management best practices, models, methods, tools, and technologies that instructional designers use in acquiring project management knowledge and ultimately in managing their learning design projects. These results will be shared with the conference audience.

Sponsored By

Presenters

La Keshia L. Nall, MBA, Ed.S. is a doctoral candidate at Nova Southeastern University. Her research focus is instructional design and educational technology. Her dissertation, titled Instructional Designers as Project Managers - A Phenomenology, describes the lived experiences of instructional designers as they learn to manage projects in higher education and on-the-job and as they actually manage projects in their professional roles. The dissertation is based on a phenomenological study that investigated the project management-related experiences of practicing instructional designers to gain insight into their common experiences and identify themes from their stories.

Extended Abstract

The ability to effectively manage learning design projects, consult with stakeholders (such as sponsors, subject matter experts, and learners), and direct projects to successful completion is a vital part of an instructional designer’s role. Although the need for project management education and experience is reiterated in the literature and in cross-industry instructional designer job postings, it is unclear how these professionals acquire and use project management skills and tools in their profession because project management is not a focus in many higher education programs intended to prepare instructional designers.

The goal of this phenomenology was to understand the lived experiences of practicing instructional designers as project managers. Results describe how instructional designers practice project management and best practices, models, methods, tools, and technologies that instructional designers use to acquire and use project management knowledge and skills in their learning design projects. Results of this study will be shared with the conference audience. Recommendations for preparing instructional designers to manage their projects in industry will also be offered.