A Gamified Design Framework for Promoting Flipped and Self-Regulated Learning

Concurrent Session 4

Brief Abstract

We created a framework, including flipped learning cycles and self-regulated learning cycles, for designing blended courses. We then gamified this framework by visualizing the learning cycles as a roadmap and rewarding task completion and self-regulated learning behaviors. A research study is being conducted to investigate this framework.We created a framework, including flipped learning cycles and self-regulated learning cycles, for designing blended courses. We then gamified this framework by visualizing the learning cycles as a roadmap and rewarding task completion and self-regulated learning behaviors. A research study is being conducted to investigate this framework.

Presenters

Chris Willis, NC State - DELTA's Coordinator for Learning Analytics and Assessment, provides leadership on the evaluation and assessment of course redesign and educational technology projects to demonstrate ways in which learning technologies, pedagogy, and teaching best practices support and improve student success and engagement. He manages project data collection, analysis, and reporting, and provides training, guidance, and support for the effective integration and use of quantitative and qualitative data collection methods for evaluating and assessing DE and blended course redesigns. Chris holds Master's degrees in Survey Research, Education, and Public Administration, as well as a B.A. in Psychology. He is also a current PhD student in the Education Leadership, Policy, and Human Development program at NC State University.

Extended Abstract

Blended courses have become increasingly popular in higher education. By integrating  online and face-to-face learning, both technology-based and human interactions can be used to facilitate the development of basic knowledge and higher-order skills. To maximize the effectiveness of blended courses, many flipped learning models have been implemented in college courses. However, college students tend to be more comfortable with traditional lecture than flipped classroom, which requires them to first complete online learning independently and then attend class to apply what they learned. To support student success in blended and flipped courses, we created a design framework grounded in  cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational theories, and developed the design features using a Moodle-based gamification plug-in. 

Our framework (see diagram) is characterized by 1) weekly flipped learning cycles including online, in-class, and after-class learning stages and tasks, as well as 2) periodical self-regulated learning cycles including planning, monitoring, and evaluation activities for managing learning behaviors. The gamification of this framework visualizes the flipped and self-regulated learning cycles as a road map, and gives students points, badges, and achievement rewards as they complete the tasks and demonstrate desirable behaviors during the flipped learning process. To help students resonate with the framework, the gamified flipped learning is presented as a Learning Progress challenge that encourages students to keep up with on-time completion of learning tasks, whereas the gamified self-regulated learning is presented as a Learning Fitness challenge that engages students in planning, monitoring, and evaluating their learning activities. 

We have applied and refined this gamified framework while redesigning four large undergraduate lecture-based courses in the fields of business, biochemistry, computer science, and math, respectively. To investigate the effectiveness of this framework, the implementation of the redesigned courses will occur in two semester-long stages: Only the gamified flipped learning design will be implemented in stage one, while the gamified flipped learning and self-regulated learning design will be implemented in stage two. We have formulated three research questions:

  1. What are the impacts of the gamified flipped learning and self-regulated learning design on student learning outcomes, behaviors, and perceptions?
  2. How do student behaviors during the flipped learning cycles relate to their learning outcomes and perceptions?
  3. How do student behaviors during the self-regulated learning cycles relate to their flipped learning behaviors, learning outcomes, and perceptions?

To answer these questions, we have collected baseline data (e.g., surveys and academic records) from the same courses taught in a traditional lecture format. We will collect comparable and additional data (e.g., Moodle analytics) as we implement the redesigned courses in two stages. Specifically, we are measuring independent variables related to demographics, prior knowledge, self-regulation skills, self-efficacy, and interests in the subject area, as well as dependent variables related to flipped learning behavior, self-regulation behavior, learning perceptions, course grades, and attitudes.

We would like to share the design framework, design strategies, and gamification strategies with audiences at the 2019 OLC conference using examples from the redesigned courses. By the time of the conference, we will be close to the end of stage one implementation and would be able to share some initial findings about the gamified flipped learning design. Given the preliminary nature of our work, we would like to hear feedback from the OLC audience regarding blended and flipped learning design and research. Interactive activities such as polling and paired discussion will be embedded throughout the session to engage the audience in sharing experience from their institutions and discussing the possibility of scaling up the application of our framework and strategies. By the end of the session, the audience would be able to:

  1. Describe the basic components of the design framework and their theoretical foundations.
  2. Recognize the connections between the design strategies and the course design examples.
  3. Discuss the reusability of the design framework and strategies in different teaching and learning contexts