Facilitating Community of Inquiry through Video: Announcements, Screencast Tutorials, Feedback, and Discussions

Concurrent Session 1
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Brief Abstract

Do online, collegiate learners perceive that video-based strategies facilitate elements of the Community of Inquiry Framework? Online faculty presenters will engage participants in considering instructional strategies and findings from a study which strategically incorporated video for announcements, screencast tutorials, feedback critiques of major assignments, and synchronous and asynchronous discussions.

Presenters

The scope of Dr. Lazarevic’s research interest encompasses the intersection of online teaching methods, emerging technologies, virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), 3D modeling/printing, cognition, and immersive multimedia development. Currently, he is a principal researcher for the following two projects: a) Facilitating Community of Inquiry through Screencasting and Video Announcements and b) VR Across Disciplines. The study Facilitating Community of Inquiry is centered on the promotion of teaching and social presence within an online learning environment. While the project VR Across Disciplines is focused on identifying effective teaching practices in using VR devices and immersive media in areas such as medicine, natural sciences, mathematics, business, language learning, sociology, art, marketing, and education. To date, Dr. Lazarevic has published two books and a number of papers in both peer review journals and conference proceedings. He is finalizing his third book entitled Presentation Media for K-12 Teachers.
Dr. Cain received his Ph.D. in Instructional Technology from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. He is currently an assistant professor at Kennesaw State University teaching online and face-to-face courses in the area of Instructional Technology. He has over 15 years of teaching experience including two years as a first-grade teacher and 9 years in higher education. Dr. Cain is the 2011 recipient of the Apple Distinguished Educator (ADE) award presented to innovative teachers and their using of Apple products in the classroom.

Extended Abstract

Do online, collegiate learners perceive that video-based strategies facilitate elements of the Community of Inquiry (CoI) Framework and ultimately contribute to their learning and satisfaction? Online faculty presenters will describe instructional strategies and preliminary findings from a study which strategically incorporated video for announcements, screencast tutorials, feedback critiques of major assignments, and synchronous and asynchronous discussions.

 

The topic of using video-based elements for facilitating the CoI in online higher education courses is a significant one. Faculty teaching in online venues seek to improve the quality of instruction and the learning experience. The CoI framework is foundational in facilitating aspects of the learning environment that address social, teaching, and cognitive presences (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000). Broadly defined social presence refers to the ability of online students to identify with the community of learners and establish interpersonal relationships with peers, while cognitive presence is the extent to which online learners are able to construct meaning through reflection and discourse. Teaching presence is the third integral component of the CoI framework. According to the proponents of this conceptual model, teaching presence encompasses the design, facilitation, and direction of instruction (cognitive and social processes) for the purpose of achieving personally meaningful learning outcomes (Anderson, Rourke, Garrison, & Archer, 2001). The avenue for addressing these presences varies with some strategies being more effective than others. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of the implemented video-based instructional strategies from the learners’ perspective. The focus is on learners’ beliefs regarding the effectiveness of their learning experience in terms of how well the strategies facilitated the CoI elements. Discussions on this topic help to improve teaching and learning in online environments.

 

Faculty attending this session will learn about the strategies implemented, the survey design, data collection and analysis procedures, and the perceptions of the students who responded to the survey. The instructional strategies strategically incorporated video for announcements, screencast tutorials, feedback critiques of major assignments, and synchronous and asynchronous discussions. The study utilized the modified Community of Inquiry survey (CoI) entitled Facilitating Community of Inquiry through Screencasting and Video Elements (FCoISVE). The instrument consisted of 31 Likert five-point scale type items and five open-ended qualitative questions purposefully design for measuring the extent of student perception of Community of Inquiry within online courses. There were 77 undergraduate and graduate students who responded to the survey at two higher education institutions. These participants were taking an online course with one of the three faculty facilitating the study. Quantitative data were analyzed using a variety of descriptive statistical measures, correlations, as well as more advanced procedures such as the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), or more precisely, the t-test. An inductive approach and in-vivo coding strategy were implemented for qualitative data analysis. An overview of findings will be included in the presentation.

 

The session will engage participants in considering ways to incorporate these strategies into their own teaching, as well as other ways to address the social, teaching, and cognitive presences in their online classrooms. One specific technology for amplifying student voice will be highlighted during the session. Flipgrid, a video-based discussion technology, can help instructors design and facilitate a collaborative-constructivist environment for learner engagement through discourse and reflection in alignment with the CoI. Presenters will model how instructors can sign-up for Flipgrid for free, set up engaging discussions, and how instructors can build a sense of community through short video responses. Flipgrid allows educators to moderate discussions, attach external links (e.g., Google Docs, Dropbox, YouTube), and provide feedback. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss ideas for using this tool in an online course.

Session Outline:

  • Introductions (2 Min.)
  • Overview of the CoI Framework and alignment of the video-based strategies implemented including providing examples used during the study (5 min.)
  • Research design, measuring instruments, data collection, analysis procedures, and findings (10 min.)
  • Video content design and teaching presence (10 min.) ● Amplifying student voice in online courses via Fligrid (8 min.)
  • Engage participants in feedback via Padlet and verbal discussion regarding ideas for increasing the CoI presences in online courses (5 min.)
  • Questions (5 min.)

 

References:

  • Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education model. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 87-105.
  • Anderson, T., L. Rourke, D.R. Garrison and W. Archer (2001). Assessing teaching presence in a computer conferencing context, Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks 5(2), 1-17.