Metacognitive Teaching – Reflecting on Our Online Teaching Practice

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Brief Abstract

To help students become metacognitive learners, faculty should first consider their own metacognition. While faculty are often metacognitive in their disciplines, these approaches are not always transferred to teaching (Tanner, 2012). This session will focus on ways faculty can use metacognition to reflect on and adapt their online teaching practices.

Presenters

Stephanie M. Foote, Ph.D. is the Associate Vice President for Teaching, Learning, and Evidence-Based Practices at the John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education and an Instructor at Stony Brook University. Prior to beginning this position, Dr. Foote served as the founding Director of the Master of Science in First-Year Studies, Professor of Education in the Department of First-Year and Transition Studies at Kennesaw State University. A recipient of the McGraw-Hill Excellence in Teaching First-Year Seminars and NODA Outstanding Research award. Dr. Foote's scholarship and consultative work span a variety of aspects of student development and transition, including: the role of first-year seminars and experiential pedagogy on student engagement in the early college experience; the community college transfer student transition; self-authorship development; engagement and learning in online environments; and high-impact educational practices.

Extended Abstract

To help students become metacognitive learners, faculty should first consider their own metacognition and the role that plays in their courses. Faculty who are metacognitive have an awareness of their own teaching practices and purpose, but at the same time, they are also aware of student engagement and learning and are willing to adapt based on that awareness (Scharff, 2015). While faculty are often metacognitive in their own discipline, these approaches are often not transferred to teaching (Tanner, 2012). This session will focus on strategies and approaches faculty can take to use metacognition to reflect on their own teaching online practices. 

The session has been intentionally designed to be conversational, allowing multiple opportunities for interaction and deeper and more reflective discussions to occur—beginning with a brief introduction to metacognition and aspects of metacognitive teaching and learning through a summary of some of the recent research and practice literature from across the disciplines and in online learning.Following the introduction, there will be an opportunity to discuss the relationship between metacognition and online teaching practices, with an emphasis on the teaching practices of participants.

Next, there will be a discussion of several short case study examples that demonstrate some of the ways in which faculty might engage in forms of thinking and reflection that produce their own metacognitive awareness. Furthermore, the cases will illustrate how that awareness can be applied to adapt online teaching practices based on aspects of student engagement and learning.

Specifically, the case studies will help participants begin to consider the following questions:

  • How they, in their role as faculty members, develop their own metacognitive awareness;
  • How they can draw on and from their metacognitive awareness to engage in iterative changes in their online teaching practices;
  • How they can apply this approach in the courses they are or will be teaching.

Finally, the presentation will end with reflection on opportunities to redesign or revise existing activities and assignments to allow opportunities for reflection and adaptation, as needed, as well as revisiting some of the ways in which participants might use their own metacognitive teaching to model metacognitive behaviors for the students in their courses.

At the end of this Discovery session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the relationship between metacognition and teaching
  • Understand several approaches to engaging in forms of thinking and reflection that produce their own metacognitive awareness
  • Identify ways in which they can use metacognition with the goal of “iteratively changing” their online teaching practices