Following our own lead: Building an online doctoral program through equal parts strategy and serendipity

Concurrent Session 6
Streamed Session Leadership

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Session Materials

Brief Abstract

Building an online doctoral program through the implementation of our own best theories and practices (and a bit of luck) is both a challenging and rewarding endeavor. This interactive presentation provides insights to the Baylor University online Ed.D. program’s design and development process that incorporated equal parts strategy (theories and practices) and serendipity (risk-taking and innovation).

Presenters

Dr. Tony L. Talbert is a Professor of Social/Cultural Studies Education and Qualitative Research in the School of Education at Baylor University. Dr. Talbert refers to his field of research and teaching as Education As Democracy which integrates social/cultural, diversity, and democracy education into a focused discipline of qualitative and ethnographic inquiry examining school and community stakeholder empowerment through activist engagement in political, economic, and social issues. Dr. Talbert’s thirty-three (33) years as an educator has included teaching, research and service in public schools, universities, governmental and corporate institutions. Dr. Talbert began his career in education as a public school history and government teacher where he applied his previous training as a stage actor by engaging his students in the exploration of the human story by integrating the students’ own lived experiences with the historic drama and comedy that encompassed the lives of the characters and events being studied. As a high school history/government teacher Dr. Talbert earned a Master of Arts degree in American Studies at Baylor University. While a public school teacher he became a popular invited speaker at several national conferences where he showcased such creative teaching seminars as He Ain’t Crazy Mama He’s My History Teacher and Thinking Thoughts That Need to Be “Thunk”. After seven years as a high school teacher, Dr. Talbert was asked to serve as an Education Specialist with the Texas Education Agency (TEA) where he facilitated professional development opportunities for educators statewide and nationally. After two years with the TEA Dr. Talbert was recruited to serve as the Executive Director of the Sam Houston State University Center for Professional Development where he was provided the opportunity to collaborate with public school and university educators and students in the exploration and application of cutting-edge digital technology integration into curriculum and pedagogy. During this time Dr. Talbert earned his Doctor of Education Degree in Cultural/Social Studies and Qualitative Research at The University of Houston. Upon earning his Ed.D. Dr. Talbert combined his passion for creative teaching with his highly developed skills as a qualitative researcher and began his career in academia with a commitment to fully integrating the scholarship of discovery with the scholarship of teaching. During his twenty-five (25) year career as a university educator, Dr. Talbert has held or holds the position of Professor, Associate Dean, Department Chair, Graduate Program Director, and Assistant Department Chair at such institutions as Sam Houston State University, Mississippi State University, The University of Houston, and since 2002 Baylor University. During his career Dr. Talbert has published over forty-five peer-reviewed books, chapters, and articles, presented more than eighty-five peer-reviewed and invited research presentations, collaboratively obtained in excess of $2.8 million in funded research, served as the chair and methodologist for over one-hundred masters and doctoral theses and dissertations, served as associate editor and editorial review board member for several academic and professional publications, and has been elected to leadership roles for several professional organizations. In 2013 Dr. Talbert decided that it had been far too long since he had been fully immersed in the real world of teaching. Therefore, he submitted an application to Baylor University for a research sabbatical and returned after more than a twenty year absence to the high school classroom where he taught World history to one-hundred and sixty-six tenth grade students. His experiences have been captured in both academic journal and popular press articles and will be the subject of a book in the future. Most recently Dr. Talbert was named as the recipient of the 2014 McGraw-Hill Distinguished Scholar Award for his contributions to qualitative research in the field of education. Dr. Talbert is pleased to discuss and offer consulting services in qualitative research design and analysis; social/cultural studies education (e.g., democratic education, multicultural-diversity education, peace education), and, public education policy and practice. Dr. Talbert can be reached via email at Tony_Talbert@baylor.edu and/or http://soefaculty.baylor.edu/tony-talbert/.

Extended Abstract

 

Session Title:

The title of the presentation is limited to 120 characters.

Try to create something that accurately describes your intended session, which is also catchy or interesting. Consider reviewing previous Best in Track proposals. 

 

Title: Following our own lead: Building an online doctoral program through equal parts strategy and serendipity 

 

Presenters and Authors:

All individuals listed on a conference proposal must have a current OLC account and their profile must be up to date. When submitting the proposal, you will select your co-presenters by using their email addresses. The system will only allow you to select individuals who have an OLC account. To make the submission process quick and easy, obtain the names and email addresses used by your collaborators prior to logging in to the system.  Note: OLC uses “Additional Authors” to indicate non-presenting contributors.

 

Speakers: Julia Earl, Cece Lively, and Tony L. Talbert

julia_earl@baylor.edu

tony_talbert@baylor.edu

cece_lively@baylor.edu 

Additional Authors:

sandi_cooper@baylor.edu

brooke_blevins@baylor.edu

nick_werse@baylor.edu

sandra_talbert@baylor.edu

leanne_howell@baylor.edu 

Laila_Sanguras@baylor.edu

Jessica_Meehan@baylor.edu

 

Session Type, Conference Track, Institutional Level, and Audience Level

In the system, these items are dropdown menus. You will be asked to select the option that most accurately aligns with your proposal. Please access the appropriate conference site for detailed descriptions of each.

 

Session Type: (The format of your proposed session.)

Education session via panel discussion

Conference Track: (The track or category of your intended session.)

Blended, Engaged and Effective Teaching and Learning; Leadership and Institutional Strategies

Institutional Level: (The academic level, rigor, or emphasis aligned with your intended session. Choose from these options: K-12, Higher Ed, Industry, Government, Other)

 Higher Ed

Audience Level: (The level of expertise of people who will gain the most out of attending your intended session. Choose from these options: All, Expert, Intermediate, Novice)

 All attendees

 

Special Session Designation and Intended Audience

In the system, these items are check-boxes that need to be selected. You will be asked to choose the option that most accurately aligns with your proposal. Please access the appropriate conference site for detailed descriptions of each.

 

Special Session Designation: (Does your intended session directly address the unique perspectives of the any of the following: Blended, Community College, HBCU, Research, Leadership, or Equity & Inclusion?) 

Leadership, Design, Blended

 

Intended Audience: (The roles of people who will gain the most out of attending your intended session. Choose from these options: Administrators, Design Thinkers, Faculty, Instructional Support, Students, Training Professionals, Technologists, Researchers, All Attendees, Other)

Administrators, leadership, program design, faculty, student support, researchers, All Attendees

Keywords:

Include relevant keywords. You may add as many unique keywords as apply. Please use commas to separate your keywords.

Student success, Program development, Program design, Program innovations, student support, online, asynchronous, synchronous. Community, 

Short Abstract:

This section has a limit of 50 words. In a few short sentences describe the main idea of your intended presentation. Use active language and craft an abstract that would make you excited to attend that session (if it were accepted).

Building an online doctoral program through the implementation of our own best theories and practices (and a bit of luck) is both a challenging and rewarding endeavor. This interactive presentation provides insights to the Baylor University online Ed.D. program’s design and development process that incorporated equal parts strategy (theories and practices) and serendipity (risk-taking and innovation).

Extended Abstract

You will have up to 1500 words to describe your intended presentation. The extended abstract will be listed on the conference website and mobile app for attendees to review (provided your proposal is accepted.) Your extended abstract should include the following points:

  • The topic of the session and why it is relevant or important to the community.

  • Your plan for interactivity (this is often overlooked - including a strong engagement strategy is one way you can significantly raise your scores during the evaluation process.

  • What the attendees are going to learn from the presentation (the takeaways)

  • No identifiable information (Proposals should be void of information that would indicate institution, organization, or personal affiliations. Anonymity is key to ensure fairness.)

Session information:

Building an online learning and organizational change doctoral program through the implementation of our own best theories and practices…and a bit of luck...is both a challenging and rewarding endeavor. This interactive presentation would focus on the Ed.D. in Learning and Organizational Change (Ed.D.-LOC) program’s design and development process that incorporated equal parts strategy (theories and practices in learning and organizational change) and serendipity (risk taking, innovation, cause and effect, trial and error). The facilitators of this presentation represent the multiple constituencies and perspectives that comprise both the individual roles of program contributors (e.g., leadership, faculty, staff, etc.) that also represent the collective integrated design team.

The EdD-LOC is a unique program design that includes asynchronous and synchronous delivery for coursework and learning sessions. This program design is complex and offers blended academic and professional development with significant community building. Included in the discussion we may consider:

  • Student support through asynchronous and synchronous models of course delivery.

  • Relationship building with students

  • Building the community among students. 

In researching our program design, we knew we needed more interaction with our students. Bettinger and Loeb (2017) found that students in asynchronous online programs performed substantially worse than students in traditional face-to-face courses. We know that regular and genuine student-to-faculty interaction produces quality online education, which leads to increased student outcomes. Because of the level of interaction we desired for our students, The EdD program hosts weekly live sessions using Zoom in addition to asynchronous coursework activities. During live class sessions, students are able to collaborate with their instructor and classmates to dive deeper into course topics by collaborating. Students from all across the country are grouped purposefully in small breakout rooms during class to share personal stories and perspectives, as well as learn from others, both within and across professional fields of work. 

 

Plan for interactivity:

During this session, you will hear from students, staff and faculty involved in the program. We will share how we began the program and where we are now. Participants will also have time to ask questions during the session 

  • Participants will view videos from students speaking to the format of asynchronous and synchronous learning modules

  • Participants will view Qualitative research data from student surveys 

Attendees will learn about:

Unique program design that includes an asynchronous and synchronous delivery. This program design is complex and offers blended academic and professional development with significant community building. Included in the discussion we may consider:

  • Student support through asynchronous and synchronous models of course delivery.

  • Relationship building with students

  • Building community among students. 

References:

Bettinger, E., & Loeb, S. (2017). Promises and pitfalls of online education (Evidence Speaks Reports Vol 2, #15). Brookings.