Going Online: An Examination of Online Learning at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Concurrent Session 5
HBCU

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Brief Abstract

Despite the tremendous growth of online learning at U.S. institutions, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have hesitated to embrace online learning. This study investigated the current state of online learning at HBCUs utilizing descriptive and inferential analysis to compare the use of online learning at HBCUs with the use of online learning of a stratified sample of non-HBCUs within the U.S. to determine the characteristics that support online degree programs. Specifically, institutional support for online programming was examined by administering the HBCU LMS Administrators Survey to (LMS) administrators at HBCU and non-HBCU institutions.

Presenters

Dr. Lisa Cole Martin is a 2017 graduate of Texas Tech University from the College of Education with a doctorate degree in Instructional Technology. Dr. Martin also holds a Bachelor of Science in Accounting and two Master’s degree, Master of Science in Personal Financial Planning and an MBA in Public Administration. She has been teaching at the college level since 2002 with prior teaching positions at Hampton University, North Carolina A & T State University, Virginia College, and Texas Tech University. Dr. Martin grew up in southwest LA and has lived in Ohio, Virginia, and Texas. She has a son who is a recent high school graduate who is attending prep school in NC this year. She enjoys traveling, reading, music, and spending time with her family and friends.

Extended Abstract

Despite the tremendous growth of online learning at U.S. institutions, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have hesitated to embrace online learning. This study investigated the current state of online learning at HBCUs utilizing descriptive and inferential analysis to compare the use of online learning at HBCUs with the use of online learning of a stratified sample of non-HBCUs within the U.S. to determine the characteristics that support online degree programs. Specifically, institutional support for online programming was examined by administering the HBCU LMS Administrators Survey to (LMS) administrators at HBCU and non-HBCU institutions.

The results showed that HBCUs were behind non-HBCUs in offering online degree programs. Non-HBCUs offered three times as many online degree programs as HBCUs. When looking at institution type, Non-HBCU were more likely to have online degree programs with Associates programs, while HBCUs were more likely to have online degree programs with Bachelor programs when looking at institution type. For institution size, Non-HBCU were more likely to have online degree programs with Small schools, while HBCUs were more likely to have online degree programs with Medium schools. For institutional location, Non-HBCU and HBCUs were both more likely to have online degree programs in the South.

The HBCU Administrative Survey data provide some insight of into how institutional support motivates E learning at HBCUs. The results from the survey data provide information about how the years of using a LMS affects the institutional support, which had no significant effect on any of the subscales. Even though, the use of a LMS for 1 – 5 years was highest for all of the support subscales (Administrative Support, Faculty Support, Student Support Interaction, and Student Support Resources) bur none of them proved to have a significant effect on any of the subscales.

The results of the final question looking at the differences in subscale elements for each subscale of institutional support. There were significant findings for many of the subscale elements. For administrative support, all were statistically significant except between Copyright and Structure (p = .32), between Authentication and E-learning (p. =.57), and between Copyright and E-learning (p = .61). For faculty support, all of the elements were statistically significant with p values < .01. For student support interaction, all of the elements were statistically significant except between E-learning and Technical Standards (p = .91), Admissions and Technical Support (p = .50) Admissions and Technical Standards (p =.06), and Electronic Resources and Technical Support (p = .22) For student support resources, all of the elements were statistically significant except between ADA and Student Engagement (p = .32), ADA and Guidance (p = .64), ADA and Assistance Location (p = .88), Student Centered and Guidance (p = .44), and Student Centered and Assistance Location (p = .17) . Overall, key results that may be taken from this chapter include the significance when looking at the comparison of HBCUs versus non-HBCUs. Additional research needs to be conducted to examine HBCUs further. This study offered some insight into online learning at HBCUs but a closer examination is needed to delve deeper into online learning at HBCUs.