Different Perspectives of Engagement: One Size Does Not Fit All

Concurrent Session 2

Session Materials

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Brief Abstract

In online classes, faculty and curriculum designers worry about how to engage students in learning. In this panel discussion, we will talk about research that is ongoing about different variables of engagement. Engagement may be defined at a high level but may mean something different in specific applications.

 

Presenters

Dr. Julie Bonner is an Associate Faculty member at Central Washington University in Ellensburg, WA. Dr. Bonner is the program coordinator for the graduate program in the Information Technology and Administrative Management department. She has been at the University three years and is very interesting in student development, course design, and how students learn.

Extended Abstract

In online classes, faculty and curriculum designers worry about how to engage students in learning. According to Carini, Kuh and Klein (2006), student engagement in class activities and assignment is just one variable that needs to be considered for student success in any educational program. In addition, Abbott (2017) indicates that it is critical to engage students in interesting assignments that connect to their career goals or that the student can follow their interest in learning the material. However, does the classroom environment equate to the full engagement experience of a student? According to Webber, Krylow and Zhang (2013) the ability to engage with a school and all of its resources can increase overall engagement for students in all aspects of their educational experiences.

In this conversation, we will talk about research that is ongoing about different variables of engagement. We propose that engagement may have a high-level definition, but each assignment, each degree program, each class has to define engagement for their specific circumstances and audience and that engagement is not a one size fits all proposition. The presenter will share research that has been completed, as well an ongoing research in engagement, to build a possible framework for the engagement conversation.

Abbott, A. L. (2017). Fostering student interest development: An engagement intervention. Middle School Journal, 48(3), 34-45.

Carini, R. M., Kuh, G. D., & Klein, S. P. (2006). Student engagement and student learning: Testing the linkages*. Research in Higher Education, 47(1), 1-32. 

Webber, K. L., Krylow, R. B., & Zhang, Q. (2013). Does involvement really matter? indicators of college student success and satisfaction. Journal of College Student Development, 54(6), 591-611.