Micro Credentials in Education - The Promise Outruns (Current) Practical Realities

Concurrent Session 10

Brief Abstract

Acceptance of alternative certifications and credentials are becoming more of an issue that educators must deal with from a legal, compliance, policy, programmatic, and practical level.  This presentation will explore issues related to alternative certifications & credentials to find the potential impact that they have on programs and services.

Presenters

Mark E. Deschaine is an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership in the College of Education and Human Services at Central Michigan University. He has extensive local, state, and national experience in training and development of faculty in the integration of technology into their curriculum, special education issues, and effective instructional practices. He holds Michigan certification and endorsements as a teacher, a special educator, and building as well as central office administrator. His research agenda focuses on how theory, policy, and processes support effective differentiated instruction.

Extended Abstract

The acceptance of alternative certifications, credentials, and accreditation are becoming more of an issue that educators must deal with from a legal, compliance, policy, advocacy, programmatic, and practical level. Many initiatives currently exist to integrate these opportunities into educational programs. However, a collective overview of how these different opportunities come together to affect the relationship between traditional K-12 and higher education programs and structures is still in the preliminary stages of exploration. This presentation will globally explore the issues related to alternative certifications, credentials, and accommodations, and to find the potential impact that they have on PK-20 programs and services.

The use of alternative certification, credentials, and accommodations are an emerging opportunity for preservice and in-service preparation & skill development. Collegiate implementation of these upcoming structures would need a rethinking of the traditional credit granting experiences and activities traditionally used for course assignments, program evaluation, or competency toward degree completion. This presentation will explore ways that the programs across higher education use and integrate these in advising and program development for their students.

Those interested in exploring the viability of the inclusion of alternative certifications, credentials, and accommodations, to meet educational programming demands for educational programs are encouraged to attend this interactive session.