More Than Just Technology: Tapping Into The Value of Instructional Designers

Concurrent Session 8

Session Materials

Brief Abstract

Instructional Designers (ID) are described as wearing many hats. The role includes designing instructional materials, managing teams and partnerships, training faculty and other subject-matter-experts, and supporting institution technology efforts. As the role becomes more integral to the success of learning environments, how can we better advocate for ID strength and skills?

Presenters

Kathleen Bulger is a Senior Instructional Designer with FIU Online in Miami, FL. Since 2012, Kathleen has collaborated with faculty to create interactive fully online and hybrid courses. She is a recipient of the 2014 Blackboard Catalyst Award and numerous Quality Matters certifications. Her areas of expertise include implementing educational technologies that enhance student engagement and user interface design.
Erika Huezo is a Senior Instructional Designer at FIU Online, Florida International University's online learning unit. She joined FIU Online in 2010 as a Course Developer, helping to create an introduction to online teaching course for faculty and assisted with the department's implementation of the Quality Matters (QM) program standards. Erika works closely with faculty to create engaging learning environments and keeps current with instructional theories, tools, and trends.

Extended Abstract

Instructional Designers (ID) are often described as wearing many hats. The role includes designing instructional materials, managing teams and partnerships, training faculty and other subject-matter-experts (SMEs), and supporting technology efforts. As the ID role becomes more integral to the success of learning environments, how can we better advocate for ID strengths and skills?

To get our conversation started, we will look at the ID’s role and value within different institutions. Then, we will discuss the many challenges we face with faculty and stakeholders who are unfamiliar with the different skills and strengths an ID can bring to the table. These challenges include a lack of faculty buy-in, unfamiliarity with instructional designers’ roles, and lack of available resources. We’ll also discuss possible solutions to these barriers.

Some of the questions we’ll consider:

  1. What are other institutions doing when faced with these kinds of challenges?
  2. How do other institutions promote IDs to their faculty?
  3. What kind of role does the ID play in the institution?
  4. How large is your Instructional Design team?
  5. What solutions have you implemented at your institution?
  6. What professional development opportunities or groups do you recommend for others?

Objectives:

Attendees will:

  1. Discuss ways of advocating for the role of the instructional designer as a project manager, learning consultant, and ed tech expert.
  2. Analyze challenges faced with communicating with subject-matter-experts unfamiliar with instructional design.
  3. Identify potential strategies and solutions to promote collaboration and resolve commonly faced instructional design challenges.
  4. Explore ways of collaborating with other institutions.