Serving Adults at a Distance: Unpacking The 60 Year Curriculum - Continuous Learning Do's And Don'ts

Pre-Conference Workshop Session 2
Streamed Session

Watch This Session

Session Materials

Brief Abstract

The modern learner is no longer the traditional, residential student. In fact, demographics and other recently published research tracking global trends suggests significant changes over the next 10-20 years in the educational arenas from K-20+. There is no longer a “traditional student”, but many campuses have yet to adjust to a changing norm. Many universities have already begun to see enrollments dip, some for the first time in many years. The face of education and of our students who seek education is changing, and we have to keep pace or lose out on opportunities to serve.

Current and upcoming trends relating to micro-credentialing and non-traditional educational pathways and models such as the 60 year curriculum are proliferating and building fast--let’s dive into each of these together to learn more, and to walk away from Innovate with some new ideas to implement in your own courses and programs, departments, colleges, campuses, and beyond.

Presenters

Sherri currently serves as the Senior Executive Director of the Office of Digital and Online Learning at Coastal Carolina University. She is an Associated Faculty with the Psychology Department at CCU, and specializes in teaching senior-level classes in lifespan psychology, such as Child Development, Adolescent Development, and Gerontology. Sherri has served in academia within the field of online learning for over 20 years in the role of instructional designer, LMS administrator, faculty, and over the last decade plus as a university-level administrator. In addition to her work with Coastal, Sherri also serves the MERLOT organization as the Editor of the Professional Coaching board, as well as an editorial board member and peer reviewer for the Psychology MERLOT board. Her research focuses on methods for improving student success in the academic environment, to include all modalities of learning (online, face-to-face, hybrid, flipped, etc.) and inclusive design and tools. She has worked as a consultant for a number of organizations to support the development of online learning initiatives.

Extended Abstract

The demise of the traditional college student model

The modern learner is no longer the traditional, residential student. In fact, demographics and other recently published research tracking global trends suggests significant changes over the next 10-20 years in the educational arenas from K-20+. We’re seeing predictions for educational change in every single avenue, location, and service. From enrollment, advising, and recruitment services to academic programming, campuses are beginning to see drops--some dramatic--and for good reason as the generational expectations, societal structure and needs, and workplace demands have changed--leaving our current educational structures a bit too far behind. 

There is no longer a “traditional student”, but many campuses have yet to adjust to a changing and a new and as-yet unsteady norm. Many universities have already begun to see enrollments dip, some for the first time in many years. Drops in enrollment, degree pursuits, and full-time learners are expected to continue for the next 10-20 years...at least. The face of education and of our students who seek education is changing, and we have to keep pace or lose out on opportunities to serve. We’re not preparing one learner for one job across his or her lifetime anymore--and the face of how and in what fashion we offer education will need to change and adapt to this demand. 

What can we, as faculty, program and department chairs, deans, and digital learning and campus administrators do to address these concerns? 

Current and upcoming trends relating to micro-credentialing (NEA, 2019) and non-traditional educational pathways and models such as the 60 year curriculum (60YC) are proliferating and building speed an interest from learners at a fast pace, resembling in many respects the speed with which MOOC’s saw a rise in initial interest and growth. Vendors within the academic technology and content development spaces are striving to keep up, and even today, more than 500 elearning content development vendors available to choose from. 

On-demand, stackable credentials, and student services are needed to meet those experiences. This shift includes involving employers and other external partners, developing a curriculum that spans the learner’s lifetime, and thinking about the institution’s sustainability as demand and demographics change. There are numerous, campus-wide changes in architecture, reporting, marketing, course content development, and more that all may come into play in better understanding the changing face of education that is coming.

For this workshop, our primary learning objectives include:

  • Discussion of changing landscape of education from K20+ & lifelong learning
  • Highlights for new methods of education on the horizon
    • Content & curricular changes
    • Inter- and intro-campus collaborations
  • Models for faculty and student support
  • Mapping a plan for the future at your institution

Come join us as we dive into each of these together to learn more, and to walk away from Innovate with some new ideas to implement in your own courses and programs, departments, colleges, campuses, and beyond. 
 

Reference Items:

eLearning Industry: https://elearningindustry.com/directory/business-categories/elearning-content-providers

National Education Association: http://www.nea.org/home/microcredentials.html