Beyond the Technology: Incorporating Instructional Design Principles into Professional Development

Streamed Session

Brief Abstract

Adobe Express or Canva? Microsoft or Google? Zoom or Teams? Often it feels we focus more on the tool than the needs of our learners. Here we will discuss how understanding basic instructional design principles can help faculty effectively choose and use technology for teaching and learning. 

Extended Abstract

It seems like every time you go online there is a new tool out there that will revolutionize education and the learner experience. As educators, we are bombarded with emails from companies encouraging us to try the next great thing and often we latch on to these new tools with little thought as to what is the best way to use them or consideration for if they are even the right tools for our class.  

It is not always from the outside either. So much of the training and support made available to faculty focuses on the basics of how to use tools with little time spent on thoughtful integration. Rather than focusing on how to use specific tools, what if instead we focused on providing guidance to faculty on how to choose tools that are right for their situation and their students? What if instead of focusing on the latest and greatest features, faculty were provided with a foundation in instructional design principles to guide them in making decisions grounded in research? 

In this session, the facilitators will discuss how understanding basic instructional design principles can help faculty effectively choose and use technology for teaching and learning. Through understanding concepts like backward design, universal design for learning, and cognitive load theory, participants will walk away with ideas for incorporating such principles into their own training and development programs. 

At the end of this session participants will be able to: 

  • Explain how basic instructional design principles can be applied to evaluating tools 

  • Develop key questions based on instructional design principles for evaluating tools