Can You Read Me Now? An Introduction to Low-Cost In-House Captioning

Concurrent Session 1

Session Materials

Brief Abstract

Closed captions enable greater learning and improved communication for people of all backgrounds. However, the cost of third-party captioning services can be prohibitively expensive to many institutions. In-house captioning provides a budget-friendly opportunity to create more inclusive media. Learn about free or low-cost options that can improve your institution’s accessibility compliance without causing financial strain.

Presenters

Jackie has worked for the Center for Distributed Learning since March 2013. Previously a technical support assistant for Webcourses@UCF Support, she now works as a web content specialist for the Instructional Development team. She transcribes video recordings for closed captioning, assists in the creation and support for non-academic web-based courses, and edits online training materials and performance support documents. Concurrent to her employment at CDL, Jackie received her B.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Central Florida. Her studies in English have strengthened her skills in writing and editing, and she employs these skills to create content that is clear, consistent, and grammatically correct. In 2016, she received the Information Technologies and Resources Outstanding Service Award. Jackie's ambition for quality and creativity extends beyond her work at CDL. In her spare time, Jackie performs and competes as a ballroom dancer.

Extended Abstract

Closed captions enable greater learning and improved communication for people of all backgrounds. However, the cost of third-party captioning services can be prohibitively expensive to many institutions. In-house captioning provides a budget-friendly opportunity to create more inclusive media. Learn about free or low-cost options, such as Amazon Transcribe or YouTube’s auto-sync functionality, that can improve your institution’s accessibility compliance without causing financial strain.