Many Heads Are Better Than One: Enhanced Collective Intelligence Online

Concurrent Session 5

Brief Abstract

This session investigates the intersection of information, collective intelligence, human interaction, and online instruction. Benefits and issues related to collective intelligence are detailed, and research-based conditions for optimum collective intelligence, including its transformation through online environments, are explained.

Presenters

Dr. Lesley Farmer, Professor at California State University Long Beach, coordinates the Librarianship program. She earned her M.S. in Library Science at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, and received her doctorate in Adult Education from Temple University. Dr. Farmer has worked as a teacher-librarian in K-12 school settings as well as in public, special and academic libraries. She chairs the IFLA's School Libraries Section. A frequent presenter and writer for the profession, she won American Library Association's 2011 Phi Beta Mu Award for library education and the 2015 Library Instruction Round Table Librarian Recognition Award. Dr. Farmer's research interests include digital citizenship, information literacy, collaboration, assessment and data analysis; she is also a Fulbright scholar. Her most recent books are Information and Digital Literacies: A Curricular Guide for Middle and High School Librarians (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015).

Extended Abstract

The wisdom society is the latest iteration of the idea of collective intelligence, which has accelerated due to social media and other online collaborative tools. This session investigates the intersection of information, collective intelligence, human interaction, and online instruction. Several theories relate to collective intelligence (Albors, 2008; Berstein, 2012; Gan, 2007; Levy, 1997; Malone, 2010; Surowiecki, 2004; Tapscott, 2006; Wong, 2012). Benefits and issues related to collective intelligence are detailed, and conditions for optimum collective intelligence, including its transformation through online environments, are explained (Boder, 2006; Gregg, 2010; Hunt, 2010; Ilon, 2012; Paulini, 2014; Recker, 2014; Robinson, 2014). Research-based individual characteristics, group dynamics, and online processes are also discussed in terms of their impact on collective intelligence (Brabham; Croess, 2013; Kellet, 2009; Parvanta, 2013; Senge, 1990; Wooley, 2010). Examples of good practices are shared (Dai, 2013; Harney, 2014; Hildbrand, 2013; Tsai, 2011)

Session Outline:

I.   Information in the digital age (2 min.)

II.  Collective intelligence overview (5 min.)

                A. Benefits

              B. Issues

                C. Impact of social media and other online collective tools

III. Research-based conditions for collective intelligence

                A. Individual characteristics (5 min.)

                B. Group dynamics (5 min.)

                C. Online processes for optimizing collective intelligence (13 min.)

IV.  Group reflection: Good practices on collective intelligence in online courses (10 min.)

                A. Identify a course that is amenable to collective intelligence

                B. Strategize how to manage communication

                C. Strategize how to manage group dynamics

                D. Strategize how to optimize the process for optimum solutions

V.  Group sharing (pair-share and report out)