Meet 'Joel': Using Storytelling to Engage Students in a Web-based English Language Course Using Rise

Concurrent Session 3

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Brief Abstract

How do I tell a story in a web-based course with no LMS?  Our solution is this course in Articulate Rise with a sleek web design, that seamlessly incorporates links and interactive pieces such as games and scenarios.  Come meet ‘Joel’ and see how storytelling makes an engaging difference!

Presenters

Dr. Karen McCloskey is an Associate Professor at Lambton College and coordinates the Advanced Teaching: E-learning and Instructional Design Program in the International Education Department.

Extended Abstract

Storytelling enables the learner to relate to more than just the basic concepts being taught (especially when those concepts relate to grammar!), but to recall more details and connect more with the information.  Media psychologist Pamela Rutledge explains the power of stories as part of ‘how we think’, they ‘provide order’ and they ‘are about collaboration and connection’ (2011). But, how do we tell a story in a web-based course with no LMS?  That was the question we asked ourselves in the International department at Lambton College when designing the first online English language course to support our ESL learners.  The format was a challenge for us, as we needed to offer this course outside our LMS but wanted to maintain a high level of interactivity.  Our solution is this innovative online course created in Articulate Rise with a sleek web design, that seamlessly incorporates YouTube links and Articulate Storyline interactive pieces such as games and scenarios.

In the course, you, the learner, are part of the story and meet Joel at school and follow him around as he meets other friends, goes to different classes (like math class to learn numbers) and then ventures out into his city as he takes part in activities like a fieldtrip and a date.  The story wouldn’t be complete without a trip home with Joel.

Does our story make a difference?  Come and have a look at our design and the ways we have tried to use the story and specific scenarios to engage the learner.  Your suggestions, either in person or by anonymously answering our questions on Polleverywhere with your phone, will be an invaluable assistance to us as we make final changes before we launch this pilot course.

 

 

Reference:  Rutledge, Pamela B (Jan 16, 2011).  The Psychological Power of Storytelling.  Retrieved from:  https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/positively-media/201101/the-psychological-power-storytelling