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ALL SESSIONS (BY DATE AND TIME):
Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 8:45 AM
UH 1070
Other
Welcome and Opening Remarks
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 8:30 AM to 8:45 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Co-presenter: AJ Kelton (College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Montclair State University)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 15min
Brief Abstract:

Welcome and Opening Remarks


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 8:45 AM to 9:15 AM
UH 1070
Collaborate General Session
Aligning Research to the Classroom Experience
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 8:45 AM to 9:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Elliot King (Loyola University Maryland)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 30min
Brief Abstract:

How do people learn? That question is central to education and over the past 75 years, cognitive psychologist have identified many processes that greatly enhance learning outcomes. Starting from a basic definition of what constitutes learning, techniques to incorporate these findings from cognitive psychology in the students’ educational experience will be surveyed. The overview will be followed by a short examination of the initial attempts to use the data generated by online learning technologies such as learning management systems and adaptive learning programs to better understand the learning process.


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
ADP 1120
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Sciences - Breakout C: Aha! Applying Learning Sciences to Course Design
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                 


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
ADP 1121
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Sciences - Breakout D: Why Do We Care About Learning Sciences?
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

             


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
ADP 1142
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Sciences - Breakout B: Impact on the Selection of Teaching Approaches and its Implications
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
ADP 1145
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Sciences - Breakout A: The Role of the Library in Learning and Learning Design: From Staplers to Serendipity
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                        


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 10:30 AM to 11:00 AM
UH 1070
Collaborate General Session
The 21st Century Library as Classroom Learning Partner
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 10:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Teresa Slobuski (San Josè State University)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 30min
Brief Abstract:

Libraries and Librarians on the User-Centered Bleeding Edge.  As institutions with a history stretching further back than university or public school systems, many see libraries as static entities. The Library of Alexandria collected, held, and made available the knowledge of the day, and so too do libraries now. However, libraries are increasingly involved in all manner of trends. Since libraries are generally not required to follow rigid curricula, in most academic institutions they have the freedom to explore new tools and technology as they become available. In this session, we will explore the work librarians and libraries are doing and how it can relate to larger educational goals. Libraries are leading the charge for Open Access, Makerspaces, Institutional Repositories, Alt-Metrics, and more, while still continuing the emphasis on user-centered service both in person and via remote access, which means everyone can learn something from the library.


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
ADP 1120
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Resources - Breakout C: Collaborating with the Library in Course Design
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

               


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
ADP 1121
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Resources - Breakout D: Innovation or Customer Service – What Can Today’s Library Do For Me?
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                    


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
ADP 1142
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Resources - Breakout B: Open Access in Scholarship and Publication
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                  


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
ADP 1145
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Resources - Breakout A: Something Old, Something New: How We Work with the Modern Academy
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 1:00 PM to 1:30 PM
UH 1070
Collaborate General Session
Applying Lessons Learned from MOOCs to the Traditional Classroom (Data, Baby, Data!)
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Deborah Keyek-Franssen (University of Colorado System Office)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 30min
Brief Abstract:

A breathtakingly short hype cycle prematurely sounded the death knell for massive open online courses (MOOCs) while overlooking the value that they bring to the table: massive data that describe the convergence of teaching, learning, and technology at scale. The University of Colorado has been a Coursera partner since 2013 and, in the course of developing dozens of courses, specializations, and even for-credit certificates on the platform, has gleaned principles of learning design from the nearly 2 million learners who have signed up for its MOOCs. Analysis of data and Coursera’s own A/B testing has given hints about how to best retain and assess the learning of the largely “volunteer” learners in MOOCs. Many of these lessons in learning design at scale can and rightly should be applied to the design of face-to-face, hybrid, and “traditional” online courses. They also bear a striking resemblance to the basics of learning design: knowing the learning audience, knowing and contextualizing what they need to learn (and how we can best determine whether or not they’ve learned it), providing community and expert feedback and coaching.


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
ADP 1120
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Design - Breakout C: Developing Connective Tissue and Context in Course Design
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

               


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
ADP 1121
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Design - Breakout D: MOOCs are Dead! Long Live the MOOC!
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

            


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
ADP 1142
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Design - Breakout B: Instructional Presence When You’re Not Looking Them Right in the Eye
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

             


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
ADP 1145
Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Design - Breakout A: Curating Learning Materials When Fair Use Isn’t an Option
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                 


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM
UH 1070
Collaborate General Session
A Regional Response: Culmination of the Day’s Thinking and Invitation to Continue the Collaboration
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Co-presenters: Elliot King (Loyola University Maryland), Teresa Slobuski (San Josè State University), Deborah Keyek-Franssen (University of Colorado System Office)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Significant changes in digital education have brought about an opportunity for teaching, learning and technology to converge. Looking at the learning sciences, the 21st century library and the scalability of learning, we can identify best practices and opportunities to continue to create an effective learning environment for student. The day’s final session brings together the thoughts and conclusions generated from the OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design discussions to formulate a regional response to the changing educational environment. Topics gathered by OLC facilitators and session archivists during breakout sessions along with those posted online by participants during the day will be used to guide this interactive final session. Led by Jennifer Mathes from OLC, each of the day’s keynote speakers will have the opportunity to address the collectively generated questions and topics and place them in the context of the broader changes occurring in higher education. The OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design response will continue the contribution to a national discussion as the OLC Collaborate sessions continue across the country.


Wednesday May 31, 2017 - 4:30 PM to 6:30 PM
CRC 1140
Other
Game Night
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 4:30 PM to 6:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: CRC 1140
Session Duration: 2hr
Brief Abstract:

Emerging Learning Design is pleased to host its first Game Night.  Join us at Wednesday at 4:30pm, or select the Campus Tour and Site Visit route that concludes at the Game Night.  Come and play your favorite games, or learn new ones.  We’ll have favorite board games, educational games, card games, and video games.  Come to play, watch others play, or hang out and have a good time.  This event is free and open to all conference attendees.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1120
Concurrent Session
Too Hot, Cold or Just Right: Technology for Numeracy in the Non-STEM Class
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jonathan Howell (Montclair State University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Many instructors acknowledge the importance of quantitative literacy in non-STEM fields and may themselves use advanced tools for data analysis, statistics and visualization. But how, if at all, does an instructor introduce quantitative methods into the classroom without overwhelming and disengaging students who may have been drawn to the field precisely because it has not traditionally required any skill or interest in science, technology, engineering or math? This presentation describes, in a Goldilocks-style narrative, the evolution of an assignment for linguistics students in which they were asked to measure vowels from their own speech and to plot their measurements on a graph in order to re-create the standard organization of vowel sounds found in textbooks. The first, low-tech iteration required students to make their visualization using paper and pencil. The second, medium-tech iteration required students to use a familiar but restrictive software (Microsoft Excel). The third iteration required students to use the powerful but overwhelming statistical computing environment R. Finally, the fourth iteration required students to use an interactive, Web2.0-friendly application, which was easily created by the instructor using R, but required no knowledge of R by students. In the second half of the talk, we compare the different versions of the assignment according to the Best Practices for Quantitative Reasoning Instruction published by the Numeracy Infusion Course for Higher Education, including: real world applications and active learning, including discovery methods; pairing QR instruction with writing and critical reading; using technology, including computers; collaborative instruction and group work; pedagogy that is sensitive to differences in students' culture and learning styles; and scaffolding the learning process and providing rich feedback and opportunities for revision. Take-aways: Quantitative literacy (like other literacies) is important across the curriculum. High-tech research tools can and should be used for instruction, but may require modification to accommodate student skill level


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1121
Concurrent Session
The Specter of Edutainment: Re-emergent Mistakes & Opportunities
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Matthew Lee (University of Pennsylvania)
Co-presenter: Ronald D. Mina (University of Pennsylvania)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

In the headlong rush to adopt principles like game-based learning and gamification for classroom use, what often happens is that the elements of play, challenge and interactivity so central to successful games are lost, resulting in unengaging “learning app” in the spirit of the “educational CD’s” for which edutainment is remembered today. This is an existential danger for the current cycle of learning games, given that non-existent core gameplay and a diluted focus on learning content were also what made late-era edutainment games neither educational nor particularly entertaining. Indeed, the state of learning games today closely parallels the age of edutainment, which focused on leveraging both new technologies (like personal computer & CDs) and collaborations between educators and developers to create new, more engaging ways of disseminating content. In the 1980s, this convergence of learning, technology, and play resulted in iconic franchises like Oregon Trail and Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? whose balance of challenge and interactive learning lent them a status beyond being merely entertainment - or merely educational. This spirit of collaboration and discovery also inspired franchises such as SimCity and Age of Empires in the traditional games industry, both of which were well-regarded for their educational content, and were highly successful on the commercial market.In today’s world, for all our literature on best practices and focus on curricula, standards, and connected learning methodologies, as well as a much larger game-playing audience, no app has managed to replicate the success of these decades-old games. In fact, it is likely that today’s entertainment-focused games have done more for education than any current educational title! This panel, primarily aimed at educators and developers, aims to correct this by looking into the commonalities behind the age of edutainment and today’s learning games ecosystem, examining both the critical mistakes being repeated today, as well as how the delicate balance of educational content and engaging gameplay early edutainment espoused not only made early games successful, but has implications for the future development of learning games in the 21st century. Intended Structure: This session is envisioned as a concurrent session (panel), with the 45 minutes structured accordingly. 5 minutes: Panelist Intros 5 minutes: Relevant Background of “edutainment” 25 minute game demos / interactive discussion 10 minutes Q&A Outcomes: Attendees will learn how the state of learning games today closely parallels the early age of edutainment, as well as how many of edutainment’s mistakes are being intentionally - or unintentionally - repeated in the modern era. Attendees will also be given core examples of what went into developing some of the most successful edutainment games, and what practices and lessons they can implement in their own work, with a particular focus on designing for hardware constraints, addressing short attention spans, and how to balance core gameplay with education in and out of the classroom, drawing on re-emergent thinking from an era that fostered interactivity, engagement, and long-term learning.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1142
Concurrent Session
What's Mine is YOURLS
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Kimberly Abrams (New York City College of Technology - CUNY)
Co-presenter: Junior Tidal (New York City College of Technology
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Hyperlink management is critical to website functionality because a site with dead links is not fully operable for the end user. In educational institutions links used for marketing, course materials, library resources, social media, and other uses are laborious to maintain and often these links are long and unreadable. In order to streamline link maintenance and improve link readability for end users, an open source, short link manager called YOURLS was implemented at an academic library. Not only does YOURLS shorten links, it also acts as a database of links and as a link manager. Long URLs are then shortened into compact readable formats on a hosted domain. With YOURLS, URL updates for existing resources can be done in one place, negating the need to update all instances of a URL on different platforms. Short links are easier to remember and can be used in various forms of promotion through social media, email, and printed material. Session Structure: The timing of the session will be as follows: 25 minutes lecture, 10 minutes exercise, and 5 minutes question and answer. We will first focus on the challenges of managing hyperlinks in the various content and learning management systems that educators use. Then we will show how to set-up a short link server and create a short domain (which further assists with the utility of short links). The short link server and domain was implemented to streamline access for our users and improve the link maintenance workflow. We will then demonstrate the types of statistics that can be pulled from YOURLs to show how the links are redirected. Following this, we will have an exercise by which each participant creates a short link and share it with another participant vocally, in writing, through email, or on social media. Lastly, we will give suggestions on how to implement a short link server at other institutions. Outcomes: Participants will learn the benefits of a short link server in an educational environment, have hands-on experience in creating and sharing short links, as well as understand the steps necessary to implement a short link domain and server.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1143
Concurrent Session
RA-based Didactic Games for Biology Teaching
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Leidys Contreras Chinchilla (Docente Universidad Popular del Cesar)
Co-presenter: Deiner Restrepo Duràn (Docente Universidad Popular del Cesar)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

This paper presents the design and development of a mobile application based on augmented reality (AR), as a teaching tool to support learning in the area of biology students from elementary school. The RA is a technology that combines elements of the real world with elements of virtual world in real time, this is done by using markers (image), which when focused with the camera of a mobile device, display multimedia content (objects 3d, text, videos and other.). For the realization of this project began with the review of applications with RA in various environments, then a survey was conducted between teachers to the school selected for the development of this project in order to identify areas and most critical themes, which led to the design of an application to support the teaching of biology area. Finally, a prototype was developed and tested among students and teachers of selected school. With the development of this project it was evident that the RA as a teaching tool improvement the learning of topics of Biology, because students can learn in an interactive and fun way, so as to achieve their attention. The presentation is a workshop style talk where the participants can interact with the mobile application


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1145
Concurrent Session
Turning Homework on its Head - Deeper Learning by Putting Students in Charge
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Michael Bieber (NJIT)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Participatory Learning (PL) engages students as active participants in the full life cycle of homework, projects and examination. PL’s core idea is that students design the questions or projects, execute them, and then assess and grade their peers’ solutions. Each stage can be performed by individuals or by teams. Students should be able to observe (read) everything their peers do so they can learn further from others’ efforts. Designing problems challenges students to critically assess understanding of a subject by their peers. This encourages students to analyze course materials in order to determine the most important aspects for this assessment. Evaluating solutions challenges students to assess how fully a set of materials (the solution) fits their understanding of the field as well as the problem posed. In this session we describe PL, present experimental results, and discuss compelling issues that arise including motivating students, assessing actual learning, learning to design and use rubrics, anonymity within online systems, trusting peers, contingency planning when students don’t participate, and what it takes for instructors to embrace the approach. This research is transformative. It combines various successful teaching approaches into a single framework and process. It brings a new approach to engaging and motivating students, and deepen their learning across course modes. We believe it will work in most types of courses including across the STEM fields; and possibly from junior high school through graduate education. It may solve some issues of engaging students within MOOCs (massive open online courses). The assessment and team work inherent within PL’s framework could enhance student’s interpersonal (soft) skills, better preparing them for the workplace. The deeper learning and motivation PL brings, even to topics that students previously have chosen to disengage with, may increase retention and articulation rates. Participatory Learning is supported by an on-line prototype infrastructure that facilitates the problem lifecycle tasks, underlying processes or “workflow” management, instructor activities and oversight, and ensuring anonymity throughout student interaction. Future extensions include group support, commenting and flagging, rating, and teaching students how to do their tasks (calibration).


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
CRC 1140
Concurrent Session
Digital Pedagogies: The Role of the Instructional Designer
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Veronica Armour (Rutgers University)
Co-presenter: Gamin Bartle (William Paterson University)
Track: N/A
Location: CRC 1140
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

As the Digital Humanities (DH) and digital pedagogies movements mature the need for effective DH pedagogy and digital literacy skills at the undergraduate level has increased. When teaching and learning emphasizing digital skills through DH methods takes place early in the undergraduate experience it provides a foundation for students to build the skills needed for a 21st Century workplace: collaboration, creative and critical thinking, content creation, and digital literacy. If we look to where teaching, learning, and digital technology converge at liberal arts institutions, the strength of the Instructional Designer/Technologist role is revealed for its unique overlap of pedagogy and technology that supports teaching and learning across disciplines. This presentation will explore the role of the Instructional Designer/Technologist as a guide and facilitator in the integration of DH and digital literacy in core curriculum and interdisciplinary collaboration. While tools and technologies are ever changing the niche position the Instructional Designer/Technologist plays has remained constant. The cornerstone of the role is the balance of teaching and learning methodologies with the integration of technology. Diverse projects for the Instructional Designer/Technologist involving DH and digital literacy include: Digital humanist that is looking to incorporate a DH project or methodologies within an established course. Training faculty and students on how to use DH and other digital tools Guided workshops in design thinking Professional development in best practices in DH and other digital pedagogies Work with faculty in guiding students to become critical thinkers about the role of technology in their world and their work. Develop interdisciplinary courses and programs that deploy digital pedagogies and tools. The presenters will engage participants in a discussion throughout the session regarding the role of the Instructional Designer/Technologist and how faculty can work with them as they incorporate digital skills into their courses. By way of example, two case studies of the Instructional Designer role within the liberal arts university will be presented. The first case study will take a micro look at engaging with individual faculty members and students as a one-time guest lecturer to introduce DH tools and digital literacy skills to a class section. The second case study will take a macro look at supporting a campus-wide DH project that aims to include all students. Participants will be able to discuss how the two case studies might be applicable to their own teaching, faculty development programming, curricular design, and/or collaboration with the Library at their institution as well as bring faculty/student research to a higher level through best practices in DH methodologies. The session will also offer a short digital literacy activity that focuses on creating an environment in which students are able to create a digital presence that will evolve with the student beyond graduation as a way to model how these objectives can be met in the parameters unique to liberal arts institutions.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
UH 1070
  • Keynote Address
Keynote Address
Applying the Principles of Learning Science to Online and Hybrid Course Design
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Elliot King (Loyola University Maryland)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

A fundamental axiom of online education is that teachers should not mechanically translate existing courses into an online format.  In that case,  how should new or ongoing courses be reshaped for the online environment? The answers come both from the nature of online education itself and from a body of research from cognitive psychology and cognitive science that provides insight in the way people actually learn.

Freed from the constraints of time and space, as well as the deeply ingrained expectations of both teachers and students, online and hybrid education provides a more flexible palette upon which evidence-based ideas about learning can be integrated into course structure and design.  The opportunity to deliver learning experiences that may result in measurably better outcomes  than in typical face-to-face only classrooms represents one of education’s greatest potential benefits.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
ADP 1120
Concurrent Session
What Students Reported They Learned by Playing Role Playing Games
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: M.O. Thirunarayanan (Florida International University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

A survey of students was conducted in a large public research university that is located in a metropolitan area of the United States. The proposed presentation will discuss the results of the survey regarding what students reported that they learned as a result of playing role playing games. The proposed presentation will highlight the results of the survey for about 50 percent of the time and then initiate a discussion for the remaining 50% of the allotted time.m Participants will be encouraged to share their thoughts and ideas regarding the results of the survey that will be presented during the first half of the proposed presentation. Participants will find out what skills students reportedly learned as a result of playing role playing games and also be able to share their ideas and thoughts with the presenter and others who attend the session


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
ADP 1121
Concurrent Session
Learning in Commons: Developing a Social Network as a Learning Environment
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Gerald Ardito (Pace University School of Education)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Learning is both personal and social at the same time. In order to investigate the impact on learning and social behaviors of graduate level educational technology students, a social network, the University Commons, was developed using Elgg software. During the study, students participated in an online course which was conducted solely in University Commons. Findings suggest that students engaged in meaningful and productive collaborations and interactions while meeting the requirements for the course. Structure of the presentation: This talk will have two main parts: Part 1 will be an overview of the design of a social network as a learning environment, which used Elgg as the social networking software. Data from a pilot study will be shared showing the benefits of such an environment. Mainly, these were increased autonomy and participation by the students, best explained as a distribution of the teacher presence within the Communities of Inquiry model of Garrison and Anderson. Part 2 will give the participants hands-on experience in working with this kind of learning environment. In this way, the session will be blended. Outcomes: Participants will leave the session with design principles for creating a social network as a powerful learning environment.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
ADP 1142
Concurrent Session
Social Network of Early English Drama
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Coming Soon.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
ADP 1143
Concurrent Session
Civic Engagement and Design: Connecting Students with the Local Community
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Karen Schrier (Marist College)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

College and high school students are generally considered to be one of the least civically engaged populations. For instance, they report lower voting rates, less participation in civic meetings or town hall events, and may not be as engaged in their local communities, such as through volunteer work. In this short talk, I describe one possible intervention to support greater civic engagement, civic interest, and civic awareness by college students. This intervention involves working with students to connect with local non-profits to support their needs through design. Students work in teams on “design-based” projects, where they create documentation and prototypes for an application, website or game that fits the needs, audience, and goals of a particular non-profit in the local community. In this talk, I share the specific process used for the design project, as well as the materials, guidelines, tasks and assessments used. I outline the problems and pitfalls that were experienced by students and real-world non-profit “clients,” and possible issues to consider before connecting students with outside organizations. I also discuss the importance of and connection among design thinking and civic engagement, and the ways that co-creation can help students more fully understand the needs of the local community. As part of the talk, I will first introduce participants to the concepts of design thinking and civic engagement and potential interrelationships. Next, I will describe my particular intervention with college students, which involves co-creating applications and websites for local “real-world” non-profit “clients,” and the process, materials and assessments involved in this. Finally, I will walk participants through a “mock” design thinking exercise to put into practice the process of creating an application, and brainstorm with the participants possible issues and solutions with this type of intervention. Participants can expect to receive an innovative approach to teaching civic engagement that can be incorporated into their own teaching, and will also receive sample materials (such as assignments, tasks, assessments, rubrics) that can be used in their own classrooms and educational venues. Finally, participants will receive a list of tools and software that can be used in this type of intervention/course and the pros and cons of each.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
ADP 1145
Concurrent Session
MarsU: A Statistics Game to Supplement Learning
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: David Simkins
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

MarsU: This project introduces a web-based game for learning developed generally to enhance learning of statistics concepts among visual learners, and specifically to improve learning outcomes for deaf and hard of hearing students. The game is intended to be played by students in a statistics course, and is considered a supplemental exercise to help support and enhance learning. The game focuses on the first concepts in introductory statistics, population and sample. While maintaining that focus, it by necessity touches on many other statistical concepts including probability and statistical inference. The game stands on its own, but the hope is to develop a series of games that will supplement the entire semester curriculum in introductory statistics. The game takes place on Mars University, or MarsU, where the player, an incoming student, seeks to propel her chosen candidate to win the student government presidential election. The game uses realistic statistical formulas and modeling to produce polls of student voters, allowing students to target their marketing to specific groups and to poll targeted or general student body polls to further refine their campaign. Increasingly learning games researchers are looking to develop games within or to work with curriculum. While multimodal learning is an effective teaching tool, it is most effective when applied to complex concepts and systems (Mitiri Group, 2008). Learning games that incorporate role play are generally themselves more complex systems requiring more time to learn the game, which can enhance but can also interfere with learning (author). The goal of this game is to make use of the advantages of digital role play and complex, contextual systems to give players enjoyable, engaging, and playful to learn. Structure: This talk and demonstration will show the game while walking through the process of development. If we have the opportunity for hands-on play and discussion, that would be best. Otherwise, this can be conducted as a talk with the game used to highlight features of learning design. Takeaway: The goal of this presentation is to highlight some of the affordances of learning game design in this environment, particularly in taking a STEM subject and presenting it for visually-dominant learners (visual learners and DHH students). We will also discuss some of the challenges in this approach to learning, including scope creep, focus on learning goals, and the effort to create playtesting possibilities to enhance the learning opportunities and level of engagement in the game.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
ADP 1120
Cohort Group
Instructional Design Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Instructional Design Cohort Meeting


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
ADP 1121
Cohort Group
Games & Learning/Gamification Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Games & Learning/Gamification Cohorrt Meeting


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
ADP 1142
Cohort Group
Librarian Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Librarian Cohort Meeting


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
ADP 1143
Cohort Group
Instructor Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Instructor Cohort Meeting


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
ADP 1145
Cohort Group
Digital Humanities Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Digital Humanities Cohort Meeting


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
CRC 1140
Cohort Group
MakerSpace/Fablab Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: CRC 1140
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

MakerSpace/Fablab Cohort Meeting


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
ADP 1120
  • Workshop
Workshop
Level Up Your Instruction: Creative Approaches to Designing Classroom Games
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Camille Chesley (University at Albany)
Co-presenter: Tarida Anantachai (Syracuse University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

Studies have shown that students typically require multiple exposures to material before learning and retention take place, yet instruction librarians typically find themselves working within the constraints of one-shot interactions with students. Faced with the typical constraint of one-shot information literacy sessions, academic librarians have embraced this challenge, seeking creative methods for incorporating active learning into their classrooms in ways that are both pedagogically sound, as well as engaging for students. The usage of gaming and gamification is one method that has the potential to provide librarians with inventive, powerful, and flexible new approaches to reimagining their instruction. Game design can often seem intimidating, however, in this workshop, the presenters propose to make game design more accessible by breaking the process down into concrete, manageable steps, sparking ideas, inspiration, and dialogue. Using principles rooted in cognitive constructivism and backwards design, the presenters have developed or refined high-impact, flexible games to tackle a range of subjects and issues such as citations, academic integrity, and library orientations. These have included games utilizing open source or free tools such as Instagram and Twine, an interactive storytelling tool, and games modeled after smartphone apps, e.g., an Instagram-based scavenger hunt and a Twine-based Choose Your Own Adventure game. We will also discuss “low tech” approaches such as paper scavenger hunts, board games, and powerpoint-based games. Attendees will walk away with the beginning stages of a game tailored to their Library, institutional goals, constituent populations, and resources.The presenters will break their workshop into several parts: --Theory: Overview of best practices and tips for game design in library instruction, based on the literature and the presenters’own experiences --Practice: The presenters will briefly discuss some of the games they have created, popular free and open source tools and give the audience a chance to play one of their games and critique it.--Create: The presenters will walk attendees through several exercises intended to facilitate the creation of their own games, including an exercise to use backwards design and the Framework to generate learning outcomes for their potential games. As a result of this session, attendees will be able to: --Articulate best practices for designing and assessing pedagogically sound games. --Adapt presented ideas and recommendations in order to customize our games or use the tools discussed to create new games at one’s home institution


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
ADP 1121
  • Workshop
Workshop
Creating Short Educational Videos: A Streamlined Process for Beginners
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Katelyn Lemay (New York University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

With the increased popularity of the flipped classroom as of late, multimedia content, specifically video, is becoming a standard part of the classroom experience. According to a 2015 whitepaper from SAGE, 68% of students watch videos as part of their coursework and 79% of students voluntarily watch videos (not assigned by the instructor) to enhance their understanding of a topic. Similarly, a 2016 survey of teachers, instructional designers, and other education professionals by Kaltura showed that 93% feel video has a positive impact on student satisfaction, while 88% feel video boosts student achievement levels. Though students expect video to be a part of their learning experience, they admit to having short attention spans. The SAGE study found that students on average do not watch a single video for more than 10 minutes, and they tend to multitask (i.e., use a second browser window or screen) while a video plays. At the same time, instructors are hesitant to create video content because there is the perception that one must be a professional video producer in order to do so. They fear investing a lot of time and resources into something that will be ultimately ignored by students. This workshop outlines a workflow for creating simple yet effective PowerPoint + narration videos. Participants learn basic principles of multimedia design and digital storytelling techniques, and learn to use that knowledge to present academic content in comprehensible, compelling short-form videos. The workshop also provides a survey of free and low-cost tools for recording, editing, and publishing media. A quick demonstration will be followed by hands-on practice with recording narration and editing a video. Finally, we will explore possibilities for video in the classroom beyond flipped lectures including assistance for non-native speakers and students with disabilities, student projects, and more.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
ADP 1142
  • Workshop
Workshop
Design a Learning App Concept (Fast!)
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Alexis Britez (Macmillan Learning)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

In this fast-paced, interactive session, participants will engage in a learner-centered design process to conceptualize, design, and test their own learning app. The presenters will take participants through a five-step design process that incorporates learning problem exploration and analysis; learning sciences application; prototyping; and user testing. This process is based on user-centered design and design-based research methods. Participants will have a deeper understanding of learning design and they will be able to adopt or adapt this design model for use in their own settings. All participants will leave the session with a concept for their own learning application. Learning Objectives: Apply a design model and design thinking in the learning design process. Incorporate research on learning in your design practice, including concepts such as motivation, self-regulation, and feedback. Co-design your own concept for a learning app with learning designers and learners.


Thursday June 01, 2017 - 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
ADP 1145
  • Workshop
Workshop
Using Empathetic Design Thinking to Fuel Your Learning Experience Designs
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Angela Barrus Payne (Pearson Learning Experience Design)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

As the world of work continues to evolve and 21st century skills such as communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity remain vital differentiators for competitive career development opportunities, learners must be prepared to take personal responsibility for their learning process and outcomes. In order to support this focus on career readiness, learning designs must move beyond a focus on knowledge acquisition to transferrable skill development no matter the content focus. This session will focus on leveraging the design thinking process to inform learner-centered experiences that encourage and support effective learning strategy development and use to inform ongoing professional skill development. In this session we will: 1. Define design thinking 2. Discover how learner empathy informs learning design 3. Demonstrate a shift in learning design concepting from a focus on content to a focus on learner needs, wants and professional outcomes including scaffolding professional skill development. 4. Practice with a brief hands-on approach aligning learner needs and wants to evidence-based design concepts using empathy practices. At the conclusion of this session, attendees will be prepared to continue to learn about and apply design thinking practices to learning experience design. Attendees will also be invited to use their new skills to become increasingly more confident in more efficiently and effectively understanding learner needs and using that information to inform impactful curricular designs.


Friday June 02, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1120
Concurrent Session
Using Role Play in the Higher Ed Classroom
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: David Simkins
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Graduate students in an industry-focused game development masters program should be looking not only to their next job in industry, but also to their career trajectory. To facilitate development of industry leaders, we have incorporated a processes course that introduces game development skills along with introductions to publication, contracting, legal issues, business development, management, and other concerns that can practically influence the development of games. While texts address the issues presented, the students generally have limited background beyond the technical and design skills involved in game production. This research project involved the introduction of role play to provide context and limited consequence to learning about game production. This study uses qualitative analysis of classroom activities along with assignments and student feedback to discern the effectiveness of the inclusion of this kind of role play to introduce important new concepts into higher ed classrooms. Based on the work of the Harvard Negotiations Project (Fisher & Ury, 1997), as well as authors in learning with and through role play (Van Ments, 1999; Carnes, 2014; author), this mixed-methods work uses a variety of techniques for the purposes of data triangulation including ground-up thematic coding (Boyatzis, 1998) and discourse analysis (Johnstone, 2008). The analysis discusses the structure of the role play intervention to help support the use of this technique in other classrooms and contexts, and it characterizes some key successes to this approach as well as some limitations and concerns that should be addressed when implementing it. Structure: This talk will be roughly in thirds. The first will be the structure of this particular intervention. The second will be the data gathering and analytic methods and results. The third will be practical outcomes for those who would use role play as a tool in their higher education classroom. Outcomes: The audience will hear an argument for when and how to use role play in the classroom with a focus on one context, but applications that extend to many other contexts. They will also learn some of the struggles encountered by this group when implementing role play in a classroom of students not accustomed to role play.


Friday June 02, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1121
Concurrent Session
Innovative Project Based Teaching and Learning Experiences Infusing Literacy
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Pankowski (Pace University)
Co-presenter: Sharon Medow (Pace University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

TBA


Friday June 02, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1142
Concurrent Session
A Technologist's Identity: Fostering Diversity in Learning
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Ke'Anna Skipwith (Northeastern University)
Co-presenter: C.L. Eddins (Berkeley College)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

This session will discuss the lack of diversity and other key issues in the field of instructional design. A case study will be used to highlight the strategies and examples to support why having a more diverse approach can assist with teaching and learning. The presenters will also share recent findings, diversity initiatives, and approaches to course design. Structure of the session: Online learning has transformed teaching and learning to the point where it has now become a normal form of education. The evolution of online learning has created a larger diverse population among its educators and learners. Behind the scenes, there could be a lack of progression for diversity in the field of instructional design. The presenters will explore the strategies for increasing diversity within instructional design and how it affects the increasing diversity among instructors and learners. The importance of improving diversity among instructional designers can positivity influence course development and design to ensure both instructors and learners feel comfortable with how the course is delivered. The session will begin with 10 minutes of sharing the data from a recent diversity survey that was conducted by the presenters and sent to instructional designers across multiple institutions. Using a small group discussion format, participants will have the opportunity to interact with the presenters for 15 minutes to learn about different diversity initiatives and how it has influenced and impacted their course design process. Examples from a case study and effective strategies will also be presented to the participants. The final 20 minutes of the session will be interactive: the participants will work actively in small groups, and "practice" creating or revising existing course materials with a diversity-design approach facilitated by the presenters. Outcomes/Takeaways: The outcomes for this session are to: Identify key diversity issues in instructional design and curriculum development Create a diverse learning framework for online course design Adapt a cross-cultural design experience to align with learning outcomes and online learning environment


Friday June 02, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1143
Concurrent Session
Beyond the Text: Converging Current Events and Digital Technology
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Frank Longo (Centenary University)
Co-presenter: Lisa Johnston (Centenary University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Although today’s students are frequently inundated with information in a rapidly evolving society, the consumption of that information often comes without useful and appropriate context, making it challenging for students to establish connections and a strong sense of relevance. One of the most significant connections students can make are those between course content and real-world situations. Even the most well-crafted curricula, however, can lack the ability to bridge this gap and fall short of instilling a methodology for learners to effectively recognize the applicability of their studies. This presentation will argue that one of the most significant steps an instructor can take in reinforcing course themes and demonstrating their practical value is through the strategic integration of current events into the curriculum, particularly through the use of digital technology. This requires both an understanding of the theoretical framework behind digital current events integration and the practical steps involved in content implementation. The framework for such an approach centers on the promotion of student engagement, the enhancement of conventional and digital citizenship, and exploration of the real-world relevance of course material. Essential to this foundation is the understanding of how current events function in a classroom environment, including the promotion of currency and the encouragement of critical and analytical thinking. Utilizing digital tools to integrate this information allows for increased timeliness and the promotion of a form of digital citizenship that is deeply intertwined with the expansion of the student knowledge base. While this presentation will touch on a variety of ways to integrate current events into the classroom, it will focus primarily on the use of the faculty blog, an accessible and flexible medium for providing supplemental content while promoting student interaction and idea exchange. This model of blog goes well beyond the musings of conventional blogs to serve as a space for supplemental reading, relevant commentary, and essential parallels between course content and real-world events. It is an extension of the classroom space that seamlessly weaves together course content and the real and relevant dynamics of present-day news. While many publishing companies have increasingly aimed to keep electronic resources timely through the integration of stories or concepts from current events, they are not yet capable of utilizing stories from the day, week, or even month before. The proposed model of the faculty current events blog allows for the timely and relevant use of recent news and developments in a way that highlights and enhances the selected text and course materials. It also allows for better instructor adaptation of the course itself to the academic and professional needs of a diverse student population. This is text customization at its best and most innovative. The proposed presentation will ideally use a concurrent model with a combination lecture (40%), demonstration (35%), and discussion (25%). Participants will gain insights into the value of digital current events and many practical examples of how this form of instruction can be integrated into a classroom environment.


Friday June 02, 2017 - 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
ADP 1145
Concurrent Session
Look Mum! No Courses! Reimagining a Games Development Education
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Robert Grigg (NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

What would you do if given the chance to completely restructure your games program? New ways of how upcoming generations learn, game industry changes, governmental restructuring and demands of university management coincide to create a perfect storm. Drawing from teaching experience and success of project and problem based learning components of our traditional program led to further research into how we could improve while moving to a student-centered learning approach. Feedback from student roundtables, surveys from industry and university management, and the influence of learning models such as student centered learning and learning objects, helped form a new model called role based learning. We present the journey of moving from a traditional course based teaching approach to a new novel role based education where project success is separated from student success, and the individual growth, learning and self-reflection is the focus even though they work within groups. The results show a significant increase in student contact hours, one to one contact time with staff and an overall study success increase of 11%. In addition, results from an investigation comparing the two systems, from both a student and staff perspective, identify integral supporting processes for the new challenges faced. Structure of the session: The session will share motivating circumstances behind the educational changes and results from the collected data. From inspiration of existing educational models, and our experience with each of them, we will go on to detail the core of the new educational model and how it contrasts with our old educational approach. We then present the experience of our transition to a role based learning. This includes a tour of the supporting education platform created and the lessons learned. Then we will show the latest results contrasting the old and new educational systems, for both staff and students. The session will conclude presenting the new challenges faced, resolution plan, and an open discussion. Takeaways: The model of role based learning, the integral processes to deliver it and how this led to a positive energized feedback culture which replaced a secretive competitive one amongst students. The steps to changing to a role based educational approach from a traditional educational approach. A check-list of challenges to watch out for, effective supporting processes and associated resolution planning. A case-study example of how you can employ existing software to assist in making it even more successful.


Friday June 02, 2017 - 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
ADP 1120
Concurrent Session
Students' Choice: Personalized Learning in Online Courses
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Deborah Nagler (New Jersey City University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

One-size-fits-all models for online instruction do not meet the needs of diverse learners. This session invites the examination of a responsive instructional design approach that customizes each student’s learning path, addressing individual strengths, needs, and interests. Participants will “walk through” and discuss a template for the development of an online course facilitating personalized learning. The methodology presented in this session applies a constructivist approach to learning that is learner-centered. The template to be presented is an amalgam of a number of online higher education courses taught by the presenter, along with those she participated in as a doctoral candidate at NJCU. In addition, the presenter has served as an Instructional Designer for an online college for the past five years.While the session is designed to present a model of overall personalization of an online college course, participants will also be encouraged to consider the methodology as transferable in part – as a unit within a course, or as enhancements within existing practice. Participants will be given the opportunity to reflect and react on the issues that emerge from implementation of this model, including the those of subject matter, class size, and course requirements. The presenter has designed a course based on the personalized learning template that is scheduled for summer 2017.


Friday June 02, 2017 - 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
ADP 1121
Concurrent Session
Virtual Reality Technologies in the Classroom
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Olga Scrivner (Indiana University)
Co-presenters: Cameron Buckley (Indiana University), Nitocris Perez (Indiana University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Virtual reality has a great potential as an educational tool in classroom settings. By adding a spatial dimension to the learning environment, this technology makes it possible to introduce three-dimensional authentic experiences to students without leaving a classroom. The use of these technologies in education, however, remains limited due to technological and methodological challenges. In this workshop, we will introduce a user-friendly methodology for creating VR classroom materials. This method consists of videos recorded with 360-degree camera and converted via youtube into VR format. Participants will be provided with a set of Google cardboard viewers (two participants per a viewer) and instructions how to upload and prepare videos for VR use. Using their mobile devices attendees will experience a short authentic video, converted to VR format prior workshop, as the conversion time may take up to an hour. We will also demonstrate our VR experiment in a language classroom. In addition to VR conversion, we augmented language videos using Unity 5. By adding additional layers with audio and quizzes, these videos offer more options for classroom activities and evaluation. Workshop Details: First we will introduce participants to the hardware and software required to create and use VR, namely 360 kodak camera, VR viewers, and conversion process. The initial demo will expose participants to the complete process of making a panoramic video, uploading to youtube, converting, and viewing it as a VR video. In the second part of the workshop, each group of participants (two per a group) will select and view videos from youtube. Finally, we will demonstrate augmented videos created with Unity and discuss best practices of using VR in classroom.


Friday June 02, 2017 - 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
ADP 1142
Concurrent Session
Rome Research Project: Students and Digital Faculty Research
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: John Muccigrosso (Drew University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Two liberal-arts-college faculty working on Rome, but from different disciplinary perspectives and in different periods, have both settled on an approach to their research material that involves the creation of a database including geographic information as an important component. Both treat the architectural manifestation of religious practice in the past: in one case, the temples of ancient Rome, in the other street shrines from the medieval to the modern. Students were involved in the creation of the databases as part of standard courses on the historical cultures as well as special courses that focused on the database, including one three-week study-abroad course in Rome. In the summer of 2016 both projects were involved in a special "institute" on the digital humanities which intentionally involved students in faculty-led research projects. Participants, faculty and student, meet for weekly updates in an effort to share both methods and results and to strengthen intra-institutional ties among faculty doing Digital Humanities (DH). The institute also led to increased collaboration within the institution in the form of both presenters being included as "clients" for a Computer-Science colleague's advanced computer-programming course. These CSCI class projects were tied to the main projects being presented here, but also with some other research interests. The presentation will include a discussion of how the databases were constructed and are currently being expanded. The interactive mapping component of each project will be demonstrated with an explanation of the digital tools that were used for both the database and the mapping elements. The challenges of working with students on humanities and DH research projects will be discussed, including some preliminary thoughts on the collaboration with Computer Science. The audience will (hopefully) learn something about the particular challenges of DH work at small schools, some of the available (free!) tools that even humanists can use, and the opportunities for collaboration between colleagues in the humanities and the STEM disciplines. Not everything worked well, so we plan to offer some cautionary tales as well as success stories.


Friday June 02, 2017 - 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
ADP 1143
Concurrent Session
Keeping the Focus on Quality in the Digital Learning Environment
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

In 2011, the Online Learning Consortium, known for the Five Pillars for Quality Online Education, introduced the Quality Scorecard for the Administration of Online Programs to support institutions looking for a research-based tool that could be used to comprehensively assess the effectiveness of an online program. Since launching the scorecard (and updating it in 2014), hundreds of higher education institutions across the country (and around the world) have used the tool to quantify measures of quality. Recognizing a need to take a deeper dive into critical indicators, the OLC has recently introduced more resources in the Suite of Quality Scorecards to evaluate course design, faculty engagement, and other areas Educational institutions can use these free tools to effectively evaluate and validate the quality of an online or blended learning program to accreditors, regulators, and other stakeholders. Using the research-based, Quality Scorecard also provides institutions with best practices from experts in the field that can be used when building a new program or sustaining an existing one. Participants will learn how these resources can be implemented at their own institution.


Friday June 02, 2017 - 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
ADP 1145
Concurrent Session
Using Games to Support Inclusive Classrooms - A Panel Discussion
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Karen Schrier (Marist College)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

How do we incorporate critical questions and uncomfortable issues, while maintaining an inclusive and comfortable classroom? In this panel presentation, panelists will share games, activities, exercises, and assessments that can be used to spur the critical consideration of cultural and ethical issues. We will also discuss some of the general requirements for addressing effective conversation in the classroom, such as encouraging active listening, building trust in the room, and tactics for engaging in positive confrontation and positive disagreement. In this panel, we will discuss, and at times disagree, about some of the questions to ask, techniques to use, topics to broach, and successes achieved in challenging students' perspectives as they relate to cultural competency, ethics, empathy and games. We will consider, specifically, which learning objectives and questions are most critical, and which games, examples, readings, tasks, exercises, assessments, and pedagogical techniques can support these goals. While the specific ethics-related topics that are most relevant and most difficult to discuss change over time, they are often notable for inciting controversy and even discomfort in the classroom. However, this discomfort can often foster more inclusive dialogue, practices and design considerations. Current examples of topics include systemic bias and representations of gender, race, class, sexual identity, and disability in games; empathy and emotion; harassment and bullying, and transgressive play, and discussions of ethics in games journalism and #gamergate. Other examples include incorporating independent games and commercial games that challenge and introduce different social experiences and new mechanics centered on them; for example, games like Dys4ia and Triad, which remix traditional game mechanics in novel ways to understand and think about sexuality and transgendered experience. Such topics often invite controversy and even discomfort for students (and educators). Techniques will be shared on how to best support an inclusive classroom for critical conversations and reflection. The presentation will share specific learning objectives, challenges, best practices, and questions related to incorporating ethics and cultural critique using games in the classroom. It will provide illustrative examples, "wins" and "fails," exercises and techniques, assessment tools, and tips on how to support effective conversation, such as encouraging active listening, trust, and constructive disagreement. The panel (anonymized) will be comprised of experienced educators who incorporate games into their classrooms, and consider how best to support inclusive classrooms. Some questions we may discuss include: What are some ways K-12 educators and college educators can use games to create more inclusive and equitable learning and development environments? How do we effectively talk about race and inclusion, belongingness and empathy through games? How do we best discuss and probe topics such as sexuality, identity, or gender through games? How do we help our students confront their presumptions or biases without losing their attention (or worse)? How can we foster dialogue and multiple perspectives using games to create more inclusive learning environments? What are some cases of successful or unsuccessful classroom activities around games and culturally responsive design?


Friday June 02, 2017 - 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM
7th Fl Conference Center
SPARKS!
Teaching EFL Pronunciation Through Audiovisual Remixes of Children's Tales
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Maria Dolores Orta González (Universidad Nacional de Cordoba. Argentina.)
Track: N/A
Location: 7th Fl Conference Center
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

The pervasiveness of technological devices with available functions such as video and voice recording, paired with access to open software online have considerably widened the pedagogical horizon of language teaching/learning processes in general and pronunciation training in particular. Open Educational Resources (OER) are those sites, materials and tools available online that are released under open licences, which allow for their free re-use and adaptation (Twigg, 2003). These innovations have naturally brought about new possibilities of developing creativity and fostering studentsäó» motivation for language learning, without the dangers of infringement of copyright laws. Such is the case of the activity of remixing, and in this particular case, the remixing of classical childrenäó»s tales like Aladdin, Cinderella and the like, which are, in their own right already, works in the public domain. The present presentation will thus aim at analysing the pedagogical, artistic and communicative potential of the remixing of classical children’s tales which will result in the production of originaly scripted audiovisual material based on the exploitation of mashup principles and the incorporation of fanfic features (Knobel & Lankshear, 2011), to be later used to cater for and enhance the practice of dictation and phonemic transcription in a core subject at Facultad de Lenguas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina. The presentation will describe and explore a project that started in 2015 and which yearly actively involves teachers, student-assitants and students doing Pronunciation Practice, a core subject in the first year within a five-year teaching and translation degree in a national university in Argentina. As the context of the project is Argentina and the participants cannot attend the conference, the presentation will consist of a 5-minute video entirely produced by the presenter and all the people involved in the project. The video/presentation will first briefly discuss the rationale to the project, namely the main principles underlying the concepts of remix, mashup and fanfics, then delve into the process of audiovisual production, to finally share some of the audiovisual material/activities produced, which is shared on Facebook and on a collaborative open interface like Padlet. The relevance of these activities to the teaching of the pronunciation ef English and to the objectives of the course in question (Pronunciation Practice) will also be briefly discussed. It is expected that the audience will be inspired and motivated by this experience in a university in such a remote country, where despite the obvious limited resources, students and teachers can collaboratively work towards the production of their own materials, using simple but interesting devices and OERs to design fun, engaging and pedagogically sound activities to improve dictation and phonemic transcription.


SPARKS!
The New Jersey Digital Humanities Consortium
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Mary Balkun (Seton Hall University)
Co-presenter: Marta Deyrup (Seton Hall University)
Track: N/A
Location: 7th Fl Conference Center
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

This session will introduce attendees to a newly created organization (September 2016) dedicated to advancing the digital humanities in New Jersey: The New Jersey Digital Humanities Consortium. Created in the spirit of collaboration between universities and digital humanities programs, centers, and initiatives throughout the state, the NJDHC is modelled on similar consortia in New York, Massachusetts, Florida, and Texas, to name a few. The NJDHC is a partnership between Seton Hall University, Rutgers University, Montclair State University, Drew University, Princeton University, and Stockton University. Centenary College was recently added as a participating member. The NJDHC is dedicated to advancing both digital teaching and research, as well as promoting the humanities in a digital landscape. The consortium's primary objective is to provide a forum for collaboration at many levels. The goals, which were articulated at our first meeting in September 2016, include sharing of materials, workshops, and speaker events in a time of limited resources; fostering inter-institutional communication and awareness of projects, whether new or long standing; cooperating on grants that will benefit the digital humanities both institutionally and more broadly; and providing avenues that enable and support various forms of collaboration--faculty to faculty, faculty to student, and student to student--at the participating colleges and universities. In this Spark! session we will give a brief history of the creation and purpose of the consortium, a quick snapshot of the projects at the member institutions, the current organizational structure, and our plans for moving forward. The goal of the sessions is to make people aware of this new resource for those involved in the digital humanities, to showcase the advantages of this kind of collaborative venture, and to encourage membership from additional institutions or individual faculty members.


SPARKS!
With the Dice in the Library: Tabletop Games and Culture
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Teresa Slobuski (San Josè State University)
Track: N/A
Location: 7th Fl Conference Center
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Nearly everyone has played some form of tabletop game in their life, whether dice, board, or card games. Indeed, the archaeological record shows humans have been playing games for at least 4000 years and have been an important socialization tool throughout this history. (Murray, H.J.R., 1952). As institutions that assemble artifacts of culture for future generations, libraries can and should include games in their collections. Indeed, some libraries have supported games and play for over a century, first documented when a chess club met at a library in San Francisco in the mid-1800’s (Nicholson, 2013). The early 20th century saw the emergence of toy libraries, established to support families in need by lending toys, board games, and other realia that support play (Moore, 1995). Today, more and more libraries are including tabletop games in their collections. In this session you will learn more about the history of games and their inclusion in library collections. You will also learn how tabletop/physical games can remain relevant and even thrive in our increasingly digital culture. Games and play are usually the first way humans and animals learn, so by understanding and engaging with the history of games participants may better conceive how games can fit into their teaching.


Friday June 02, 2017 - 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
CRC 1140
Other
After Party
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: CRC 1140
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

What better way to end the conference than with colleagues, new friends, and an open bar (and food!).  Enjoy beer, wine, soft drinks and sparkling water from the bar, and a hot and cold Hors D'Oeuvre station - including cheese & crackers, quesadillas, crudite, coconut shrimp, and spinach and feta phyllo.  Join special guests AJ Kelton, Deb Keyek-Franssen, Elliott King, Jennifer Mathes, and Teresa Slobuski.  The After Party runs Friday from 2pm-3:30pm.  Must be 21 or older to attend.  Cost: $33

 


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PRESENTERS' SCHEDULE

Technical Services and Electronic Resources Librar - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
What's Mine is YOURLS
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Kimberly Abrams (New York City College of Technology - CUNY)
Co-presenter: Junior Tidal (New York City College of Technology
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Hyperlink management is critical to website functionality because a site with dead links is not fully operable for the end user. In educational institutions links used for marketing, course materials, library resources, social media, and other uses are laborious to maintain and often these links are long and unreadable. In order to streamline link maintenance and improve link readability for end users, an open source, short link manager called YOURLS was implemented at an academic library. Not only does YOURLS shorten links, it also acts as a database of links and as a link manager. Long URLs are then shortened into compact readable formats on a hosted domain. With YOURLS, URL updates for existing resources can be done in one place, negating the need to update all instances of a URL on different platforms. Short links are easier to remember and can be used in various forms of promotion through social media, email, and printed material. Session Structure: The timing of the session will be as follows: 25 minutes lecture, 10 minutes exercise, and 5 minutes question and answer. We will first focus on the challenges of managing hyperlinks in the various content and learning management systems that educators use. Then we will show how to set-up a short link server and create a short domain (which further assists with the utility of short links). The short link server and domain was implemented to streamline access for our users and improve the link maintenance workflow. We will then demonstrate the types of statistics that can be pulled from YOURLs to show how the links are redirected. Following this, we will have an exercise by which each participant creates a short link and share it with another participant vocally, in writing, through email, or on social media. Lastly, we will give suggestions on how to implement a short link server at other institutions. Outcomes: Participants will learn the benefits of a short link server in an educational environment, have hands-on experience in creating and sharing short links, as well as understand the steps necessary to implement a short link domain and server.


Learning Commons Librarian - Bio & Photo
  • Workshop
Workshop
Level Up Your Instruction: Creative Approaches to Designing Classroom Games
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Camille Chesley (University at Albany)
Co-presenter: Tarida Anantachai (Syracuse University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

Studies have shown that students typically require multiple exposures to material before learning and retention take place, yet instruction librarians typically find themselves working within the constraints of one-shot interactions with students. Faced with the typical constraint of one-shot information literacy sessions, academic librarians have embraced this challenge, seeking creative methods for incorporating active learning into their classrooms in ways that are both pedagogically sound, as well as engaging for students. The usage of gaming and gamification is one method that has the potential to provide librarians with inventive, powerful, and flexible new approaches to reimagining their instruction. Game design can often seem intimidating, however, in this workshop, the presenters propose to make game design more accessible by breaking the process down into concrete, manageable steps, sparking ideas, inspiration, and dialogue. Using principles rooted in cognitive constructivism and backwards design, the presenters have developed or refined high-impact, flexible games to tackle a range of subjects and issues such as citations, academic integrity, and library orientations. These have included games utilizing open source or free tools such as Instagram and Twine, an interactive storytelling tool, and games modeled after smartphone apps, e.g., an Instagram-based scavenger hunt and a Twine-based Choose Your Own Adventure game. We will also discuss “low tech” approaches such as paper scavenger hunts, board games, and powerpoint-based games. Attendees will walk away with the beginning stages of a game tailored to their Library, institutional goals, constituent populations, and resources.The presenters will break their workshop into several parts: --Theory: Overview of best practices and tips for game design in library instruction, based on the literature and the presenters’own experiences --Practice: The presenters will briefly discuss some of the games they have created, popular free and open source tools and give the audience a chance to play one of their games and critique it.--Create: The presenters will walk attendees through several exercises intended to facilitate the creation of their own games, including an exercise to use backwards design and the Framework to generate learning outcomes for their potential games. As a result of this session, attendees will be able to: --Articulate best practices for designing and assessing pedagogically sound games. --Adapt presented ideas and recommendations in order to customize our games or use the tools discussed to create new games at one’s home institution


Assistant Chair and Assistant Professor of STEM-D - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Learning in Commons: Developing a Social Network as a Learning Environment
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Gerald Ardito (Pace University School of Education)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Learning is both personal and social at the same time. In order to investigate the impact on learning and social behaviors of graduate level educational technology students, a social network, the University Commons, was developed using Elgg software. During the study, students participated in an online course which was conducted solely in University Commons. Findings suggest that students engaged in meaningful and productive collaborations and interactions while meeting the requirements for the course. Structure of the presentation: This talk will have two main parts: Part 1 will be an overview of the design of a social network as a learning environment, which used Elgg as the social networking software. Data from a pilot study will be shared showing the benefits of such an environment. Mainly, these were increased autonomy and participation by the students, best explained as a distribution of the teacher presence within the Communities of Inquiry model of Garrison and Anderson. Part 2 will give the participants hands-on experience in working with this kind of learning environment. In this way, the session will be blended. Outcomes: Participants will leave the session with design principles for creating a social network as a powerful learning environment.


Instructional Designer - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Digital Pedagogies: The Role of the Instructional Designer
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Veronica Armour (Rutgers University)
Co-presenter: Gamin Bartle (William Paterson University)
Track: N/A
Location: CRC 1140
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

As the Digital Humanities (DH) and digital pedagogies movements mature the need for effective DH pedagogy and digital literacy skills at the undergraduate level has increased. When teaching and learning emphasizing digital skills through DH methods takes place early in the undergraduate experience it provides a foundation for students to build the skills needed for a 21st Century workplace: collaboration, creative and critical thinking, content creation, and digital literacy. If we look to where teaching, learning, and digital technology converge at liberal arts institutions, the strength of the Instructional Designer/Technologist role is revealed for its unique overlap of pedagogy and technology that supports teaching and learning across disciplines. This presentation will explore the role of the Instructional Designer/Technologist as a guide and facilitator in the integration of DH and digital literacy in core curriculum and interdisciplinary collaboration. While tools and technologies are ever changing the niche position the Instructional Designer/Technologist plays has remained constant. The cornerstone of the role is the balance of teaching and learning methodologies with the integration of technology. Diverse projects for the Instructional Designer/Technologist involving DH and digital literacy include: Digital humanist that is looking to incorporate a DH project or methodologies within an established course. Training faculty and students on how to use DH and other digital tools Guided workshops in design thinking Professional development in best practices in DH and other digital pedagogies Work with faculty in guiding students to become critical thinkers about the role of technology in their world and their work. Develop interdisciplinary courses and programs that deploy digital pedagogies and tools. The presenters will engage participants in a discussion throughout the session regarding the role of the Instructional Designer/Technologist and how faculty can work with them as they incorporate digital skills into their courses. By way of example, two case studies of the Instructional Designer role within the liberal arts university will be presented. The first case study will take a micro look at engaging with individual faculty members and students as a one-time guest lecturer to introduce DH tools and digital literacy skills to a class section. The second case study will take a macro look at supporting a campus-wide DH project that aims to include all students. Participants will be able to discuss how the two case studies might be applicable to their own teaching, faculty development programming, curricular design, and/or collaboration with the Library at their institution as well as bring faculty/student research to a higher level through best practices in DH methodologies. The session will also offer a short digital literacy activity that focuses on creating an environment in which students are able to create a digital presence that will evolve with the student beyond graduation as a way to model how these objectives can be met in the parameters unique to liberal arts institutions.


Professor of English and Chairperson of the Englis - Bio & Photo
SPARKS!
The New Jersey Digital Humanities Consortium
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Mary Balkun (Seton Hall University)
Co-presenter: Marta Deyrup (Seton Hall University)
Track: N/A
Location: 7th Fl Conference Center
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

This session will introduce attendees to a newly created organization (September 2016) dedicated to advancing the digital humanities in New Jersey: The New Jersey Digital Humanities Consortium. Created in the spirit of collaboration between universities and digital humanities programs, centers, and initiatives throughout the state, the NJDHC is modelled on similar consortia in New York, Massachusetts, Florida, and Texas, to name a few. The NJDHC is a partnership between Seton Hall University, Rutgers University, Montclair State University, Drew University, Princeton University, and Stockton University. Centenary College was recently added as a participating member. The NJDHC is dedicated to advancing both digital teaching and research, as well as promoting the humanities in a digital landscape. The consortium's primary objective is to provide a forum for collaboration at many levels. The goals, which were articulated at our first meeting in September 2016, include sharing of materials, workshops, and speaker events in a time of limited resources; fostering inter-institutional communication and awareness of projects, whether new or long standing; cooperating on grants that will benefit the digital humanities both institutionally and more broadly; and providing avenues that enable and support various forms of collaboration--faculty to faculty, faculty to student, and student to student--at the participating colleges and universities. In this Spark! session we will give a brief history of the creation and purpose of the consortium, a quick snapshot of the projects at the member institutions, the current organizational structure, and our plans for moving forward. The goal of the sessions is to make people aware of this new resource for those involved in the digital humanities, to showcase the advantages of this kind of collaborative venture, and to encourage membership from additional institutions or individual faculty members.


Concurrent Session
Digital Pedagogies: The Role of the Instructional Designer
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Veronica Armour (Rutgers University)
Co-presenter: Gamin Bartle (William Paterson University)
Track: N/A
Location: CRC 1140
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

As the Digital Humanities (DH) and digital pedagogies movements mature the need for effective DH pedagogy and digital literacy skills at the undergraduate level has increased. When teaching and learning emphasizing digital skills through DH methods takes place early in the undergraduate experience it provides a foundation for students to build the skills needed for a 21st Century workplace: collaboration, creative and critical thinking, content creation, and digital literacy. If we look to where teaching, learning, and digital technology converge at liberal arts institutions, the strength of the Instructional Designer/Technologist role is revealed for its unique overlap of pedagogy and technology that supports teaching and learning across disciplines. This presentation will explore the role of the Instructional Designer/Technologist as a guide and facilitator in the integration of DH and digital literacy in core curriculum and interdisciplinary collaboration. While tools and technologies are ever changing the niche position the Instructional Designer/Technologist plays has remained constant. The cornerstone of the role is the balance of teaching and learning methodologies with the integration of technology. Diverse projects for the Instructional Designer/Technologist involving DH and digital literacy include: Digital humanist that is looking to incorporate a DH project or methodologies within an established course. Training faculty and students on how to use DH and other digital tools Guided workshops in design thinking Professional development in best practices in DH and other digital pedagogies Work with faculty in guiding students to become critical thinkers about the role of technology in their world and their work. Develop interdisciplinary courses and programs that deploy digital pedagogies and tools. The presenters will engage participants in a discussion throughout the session regarding the role of the Instructional Designer/Technologist and how faculty can work with them as they incorporate digital skills into their courses. By way of example, two case studies of the Instructional Designer role within the liberal arts university will be presented. The first case study will take a micro look at engaging with individual faculty members and students as a one-time guest lecturer to introduce DH tools and digital literacy skills to a class section. The second case study will take a macro look at supporting a campus-wide DH project that aims to include all students. Participants will be able to discuss how the two case studies might be applicable to their own teaching, faculty development programming, curricular design, and/or collaboration with the Library at their institution as well as bring faculty/student research to a higher level through best practices in DH methodologies. The session will also offer a short digital literacy activity that focuses on creating an environment in which students are able to create a digital presence that will evolve with the student beyond graduation as a way to model how these objectives can be met in the parameters unique to liberal arts institutions.


Independent Scholar - Bio & Photo
  • Workshop
Workshop
Design a Learning App Concept (Fast!)
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Alexis Britez (Macmillan Learning)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

In this fast-paced, interactive session, participants will engage in a learner-centered design process to conceptualize, design, and test their own learning app. The presenters will take participants through a five-step design process that incorporates learning problem exploration and analysis; learning sciences application; prototyping; and user testing. This process is based on user-centered design and design-based research methods. Participants will have a deeper understanding of learning design and they will be able to adopt or adapt this design model for use in their own settings. All participants will leave the session with a concept for their own learning application. Learning Objectives: Apply a design model and design thinking in the learning design process. Incorporate research on learning in your design practice, including concepts such as motivation, self-regulation, and feedback. Co-design your own concept for a learning app with learning designers and learners.


Professor in NJIT's Information Systems Department - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Turning Homework on its Head - Deeper Learning by Putting Students in Charge
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Michael Bieber (NJIT)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Participatory Learning (PL) engages students as active participants in the full life cycle of homework, projects and examination. PL’s core idea is that students design the questions or projects, execute them, and then assess and grade their peers’ solutions. Each stage can be performed by individuals or by teams. Students should be able to observe (read) everything their peers do so they can learn further from others’ efforts. Designing problems challenges students to critically assess understanding of a subject by their peers. This encourages students to analyze course materials in order to determine the most important aspects for this assessment. Evaluating solutions challenges students to assess how fully a set of materials (the solution) fits their understanding of the field as well as the problem posed. In this session we describe PL, present experimental results, and discuss compelling issues that arise including motivating students, assessing actual learning, learning to design and use rubrics, anonymity within online systems, trusting peers, contingency planning when students don’t participate, and what it takes for instructors to embrace the approach. This research is transformative. It combines various successful teaching approaches into a single framework and process. It brings a new approach to engaging and motivating students, and deepen their learning across course modes. We believe it will work in most types of courses including across the STEM fields; and possibly from junior high school through graduate education. It may solve some issues of engaging students within MOOCs (massive open online courses). The assessment and team work inherent within PL’s framework could enhance student’s interpersonal (soft) skills, better preparing them for the workplace. The deeper learning and motivation PL brings, even to topics that students previously have chosen to disengage with, may increase retention and articulation rates. Participatory Learning is supported by an on-line prototype infrastructure that facilitates the problem lifecycle tasks, underlying processes or “workflow” management, instructor activities and oversight, and ensuring anonymity throughout student interaction. Future extensions include group support, commenting and flagging, rating, and teaching students how to do their tasks (calibration).


Director of Digital Innovation - Bio & Photo
  • Workshop
Workshop
Design a Learning App Concept (Fast!)
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Alexis Britez (Macmillan Learning)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

In this fast-paced, interactive session, participants will engage in a learner-centered design process to conceptualize, design, and test their own learning app. The presenters will take participants through a five-step design process that incorporates learning problem exploration and analysis; learning sciences application; prototyping; and user testing. This process is based on user-centered design and design-based research methods. Participants will have a deeper understanding of learning design and they will be able to adopt or adapt this design model for use in their own settings. All participants will leave the session with a concept for their own learning application. Learning Objectives: Apply a design model and design thinking in the learning design process. Incorporate research on learning in your design practice, including concepts such as motivation, self-regulation, and feedback. Co-design your own concept for a learning app with learning designers and learners.


Digital Artist - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Virtual Reality Technologies in the Classroom
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Olga Scrivner (Indiana University)
Co-presenters: Cameron Buckley (Indiana University), Nitocris Perez (Indiana University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Virtual reality has a great potential as an educational tool in classroom settings. By adding a spatial dimension to the learning environment, this technology makes it possible to introduce three-dimensional authentic experiences to students without leaving a classroom. The use of these technologies in education, however, remains limited due to technological and methodological challenges. In this workshop, we will introduce a user-friendly methodology for creating VR classroom materials. This method consists of videos recorded with 360-degree camera and converted via youtube into VR format. Participants will be provided with a set of Google cardboard viewers (two participants per a viewer) and instructions how to upload and prepare videos for VR use. Using their mobile devices attendees will experience a short authentic video, converted to VR format prior workshop, as the conversion time may take up to an hour. We will also demonstrate our VR experiment in a language classroom. In addition to VR conversion, we augmented language videos using Unity 5. By adding additional layers with audio and quizzes, these videos offer more options for classroom activities and evaluation. Workshop Details: First we will introduce participants to the hardware and software required to create and use VR, namely 360 kodak camera, VR viewers, and conversion process. The initial demo will expose participants to the complete process of making a panoramic video, uploading to youtube, converting, and viewing it as a VR video. In the second part of the workshop, each group of participants (two per a group) will select and view videos from youtube. Finally, we will demonstrate augmented videos created with Unity and discuss best practices of using VR in classroom.


Reference Librarian and Subject Librarian for Jour - Bio & Photo
  • Workshop
Workshop
Level Up Your Instruction: Creative Approaches to Designing Classroom Games
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Camille Chesley (University at Albany)
Co-presenter: Tarida Anantachai (Syracuse University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

Studies have shown that students typically require multiple exposures to material before learning and retention take place, yet instruction librarians typically find themselves working within the constraints of one-shot interactions with students. Faced with the typical constraint of one-shot information literacy sessions, academic librarians have embraced this challenge, seeking creative methods for incorporating active learning into their classrooms in ways that are both pedagogically sound, as well as engaging for students. The usage of gaming and gamification is one method that has the potential to provide librarians with inventive, powerful, and flexible new approaches to reimagining their instruction. Game design can often seem intimidating, however, in this workshop, the presenters propose to make game design more accessible by breaking the process down into concrete, manageable steps, sparking ideas, inspiration, and dialogue. Using principles rooted in cognitive constructivism and backwards design, the presenters have developed or refined high-impact, flexible games to tackle a range of subjects and issues such as citations, academic integrity, and library orientations. These have included games utilizing open source or free tools such as Instagram and Twine, an interactive storytelling tool, and games modeled after smartphone apps, e.g., an Instagram-based scavenger hunt and a Twine-based Choose Your Own Adventure game. We will also discuss “low tech” approaches such as paper scavenger hunts, board games, and powerpoint-based games. Attendees will walk away with the beginning stages of a game tailored to their Library, institutional goals, constituent populations, and resources.The presenters will break their workshop into several parts: --Theory: Overview of best practices and tips for game design in library instruction, based on the literature and the presenters’own experiences --Practice: The presenters will briefly discuss some of the games they have created, popular free and open source tools and give the audience a chance to play one of their games and critique it.--Create: The presenters will walk attendees through several exercises intended to facilitate the creation of their own games, including an exercise to use backwards design and the Framework to generate learning outcomes for their potential games. As a result of this session, attendees will be able to: --Articulate best practices for designing and assessing pedagogically sound games. --Adapt presented ideas and recommendations in order to customize our games or use the tools discussed to create new games at one’s home institution


Systems Engineering - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
RA-based Didactic Games for Biology Teaching
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Leidys Contreras Chinchilla (Docente Universidad Popular del Cesar)
Co-presenter: Deiner Restrepo Duràn (Docente Universidad Popular del Cesar)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

This paper presents the design and development of a mobile application based on augmented reality (AR), as a teaching tool to support learning in the area of biology students from elementary school. The RA is a technology that combines elements of the real world with elements of virtual world in real time, this is done by using markers (image), which when focused with the camera of a mobile device, display multimedia content (objects 3d, text, videos and other.). For the realization of this project began with the review of applications with RA in various environments, then a survey was conducted between teachers to the school selected for the development of this project in order to identify areas and most critical themes, which led to the design of an application to support the teaching of biology area. Finally, a prototype was developed and tested among students and teachers of selected school. With the development of this project it was evident that the RA as a teaching tool improvement the learning of topics of Biology, because students can learn in an interactive and fun way, so as to achieve their attention. The presentation is a workshop style talk where the participants can interact with the mobile application


SPARKS!
The New Jersey Digital Humanities Consortium
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Mary Balkun (Seton Hall University)
Co-presenter: Marta Deyrup (Seton Hall University)
Track: N/A
Location: 7th Fl Conference Center
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

This session will introduce attendees to a newly created organization (September 2016) dedicated to advancing the digital humanities in New Jersey: The New Jersey Digital Humanities Consortium. Created in the spirit of collaboration between universities and digital humanities programs, centers, and initiatives throughout the state, the NJDHC is modelled on similar consortia in New York, Massachusetts, Florida, and Texas, to name a few. The NJDHC is a partnership between Seton Hall University, Rutgers University, Montclair State University, Drew University, Princeton University, and Stockton University. Centenary College was recently added as a participating member. The NJDHC is dedicated to advancing both digital teaching and research, as well as promoting the humanities in a digital landscape. The consortium's primary objective is to provide a forum for collaboration at many levels. The goals, which were articulated at our first meeting in September 2016, include sharing of materials, workshops, and speaker events in a time of limited resources; fostering inter-institutional communication and awareness of projects, whether new or long standing; cooperating on grants that will benefit the digital humanities both institutionally and more broadly; and providing avenues that enable and support various forms of collaboration--faculty to faculty, faculty to student, and student to student--at the participating colleges and universities. In this Spark! session we will give a brief history of the creation and purpose of the consortium, a quick snapshot of the projects at the member institutions, the current organizational structure, and our plans for moving forward. The goal of the sessions is to make people aware of this new resource for those involved in the digital humanities, to showcase the advantages of this kind of collaborative venture, and to encourage membership from additional institutions or individual faculty members.


Systems Engineer Student - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
RA-based Didactic Games for Biology Teaching
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Leidys Contreras Chinchilla (Docente Universidad Popular del Cesar)
Co-presenter: Deiner Restrepo Duràn (Docente Universidad Popular del Cesar)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

This paper presents the design and development of a mobile application based on augmented reality (AR), as a teaching tool to support learning in the area of biology students from elementary school. The RA is a technology that combines elements of the real world with elements of virtual world in real time, this is done by using markers (image), which when focused with the camera of a mobile device, display multimedia content (objects 3d, text, videos and other.). For the realization of this project began with the review of applications with RA in various environments, then a survey was conducted between teachers to the school selected for the development of this project in order to identify areas and most critical themes, which led to the design of an application to support the teaching of biology area. Finally, a prototype was developed and tested among students and teachers of selected school. With the development of this project it was evident that the RA as a teaching tool improvement the learning of topics of Biology, because students can learn in an interactive and fun way, so as to achieve their attention. The presentation is a workshop style talk where the participants can interact with the mobile application


Full-time Instructional Designer - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
A Technologist's Identity: Fostering Diversity in Learning
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Ke'Anna Skipwith (Northeastern University)
Co-presenter: C.L. Eddins (Berkeley College)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

This session will discuss the lack of diversity and other key issues in the field of instructional design. A case study will be used to highlight the strategies and examples to support why having a more diverse approach can assist with teaching and learning. The presenters will also share recent findings, diversity initiatives, and approaches to course design. Structure of the session: Online learning has transformed teaching and learning to the point where it has now become a normal form of education. The evolution of online learning has created a larger diverse population among its educators and learners. Behind the scenes, there could be a lack of progression for diversity in the field of instructional design. The presenters will explore the strategies for increasing diversity within instructional design and how it affects the increasing diversity among instructors and learners. The importance of improving diversity among instructional designers can positivity influence course development and design to ensure both instructors and learners feel comfortable with how the course is delivered. The session will begin with 10 minutes of sharing the data from a recent diversity survey that was conducted by the presenters and sent to instructional designers across multiple institutions. Using a small group discussion format, participants will have the opportunity to interact with the presenters for 15 minutes to learn about different diversity initiatives and how it has influenced and impacted their course design process. Examples from a case study and effective strategies will also be presented to the participants. The final 20 minutes of the session will be interactive: the participants will work actively in small groups, and "practice" creating or revising existing course materials with a diversity-design approach facilitated by the presenters. Outcomes/Takeaways: The outcomes for this session are to: Identify key diversity issues in instructional design and curriculum development Create a diverse learning framework for online course design Adapt a cross-cultural design experience to align with learning outcomes and online learning environment


Lecturer - Bio & Photo
SPARKS!
Teaching EFL Pronunciation Through Audiovisual Remixes of Children's Tales
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Maria Dolores Orta González (Universidad Nacional de Cordoba. Argentina.)
Track: N/A
Location: 7th Fl Conference Center
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

The pervasiveness of technological devices with available functions such as video and voice recording, paired with access to open software online have considerably widened the pedagogical horizon of language teaching/learning processes in general and pronunciation training in particular. Open Educational Resources (OER) are those sites, materials and tools available online that are released under open licences, which allow for their free re-use and adaptation (Twigg, 2003). These innovations have naturally brought about new possibilities of developing creativity and fostering studentsäó» motivation for language learning, without the dangers of infringement of copyright laws. Such is the case of the activity of remixing, and in this particular case, the remixing of classical childrenäó»s tales like Aladdin, Cinderella and the like, which are, in their own right already, works in the public domain. The present presentation will thus aim at analysing the pedagogical, artistic and communicative potential of the remixing of classical children’s tales which will result in the production of originaly scripted audiovisual material based on the exploitation of mashup principles and the incorporation of fanfic features (Knobel & Lankshear, 2011), to be later used to cater for and enhance the practice of dictation and phonemic transcription in a core subject at Facultad de Lenguas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina. The presentation will describe and explore a project that started in 2015 and which yearly actively involves teachers, student-assitants and students doing Pronunciation Practice, a core subject in the first year within a five-year teaching and translation degree in a national university in Argentina. As the context of the project is Argentina and the participants cannot attend the conference, the presentation will consist of a 5-minute video entirely produced by the presenter and all the people involved in the project. The video/presentation will first briefly discuss the rationale to the project, namely the main principles underlying the concepts of remix, mashup and fanfics, then delve into the process of audiovisual production, to finally share some of the audiovisual material/activities produced, which is shared on Facebook and on a collaborative open interface like Padlet. The relevance of these activities to the teaching of the pronunciation ef English and to the objectives of the course in question (Pronunciation Practice) will also be briefly discussed. It is expected that the audience will be inspired and motivated by this experience in a university in such a remote country, where despite the obvious limited resources, students and teachers can collaboratively work towards the production of their own materials, using simple but interesting devices and OERs to design fun, engaging and pedagogically sound activities to improve dictation and phonemic transcription.


Senior Lecturer - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Look Mum! No Courses! Reimagining a Games Development Education
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Robert Grigg (NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

What would you do if given the chance to completely restructure your games program? New ways of how upcoming generations learn, game industry changes, governmental restructuring and demands of university management coincide to create a perfect storm. Drawing from teaching experience and success of project and problem based learning components of our traditional program led to further research into how we could improve while moving to a student-centered learning approach. Feedback from student roundtables, surveys from industry and university management, and the influence of learning models such as student centered learning and learning objects, helped form a new model called role based learning. We present the journey of moving from a traditional course based teaching approach to a new novel role based education where project success is separated from student success, and the individual growth, learning and self-reflection is the focus even though they work within groups. The results show a significant increase in student contact hours, one to one contact time with staff and an overall study success increase of 11%. In addition, results from an investigation comparing the two systems, from both a student and staff perspective, identify integral supporting processes for the new challenges faced. Structure of the session: The session will share motivating circumstances behind the educational changes and results from the collected data. From inspiration of existing educational models, and our experience with each of them, we will go on to detail the core of the new educational model and how it contrasts with our old educational approach. We then present the experience of our transition to a role based learning. This includes a tour of the supporting education platform created and the lessons learned. Then we will show the latest results contrasting the old and new educational systems, for both staff and students. The session will conclude presenting the new challenges faced, resolution plan, and an open discussion. Takeaways: The model of role based learning, the integral processes to deliver it and how this led to a positive energized feedback culture which replaced a secretive competitive one amongst students. The steps to changing to a role based educational approach from a traditional educational approach. A check-list of challenges to watch out for, effective supporting processes and associated resolution planning. A case-study example of how you can employ existing software to assist in making it even more successful.


Assistant Professor and Engaged Teaching Fellow in - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Too Hot, Cold or Just Right: Technology for Numeracy in the Non-STEM Class
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jonathan Howell (Montclair State University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Many instructors acknowledge the importance of quantitative literacy in non-STEM fields and may themselves use advanced tools for data analysis, statistics and visualization. But how, if at all, does an instructor introduce quantitative methods into the classroom without overwhelming and disengaging students who may have been drawn to the field precisely because it has not traditionally required any skill or interest in science, technology, engineering or math? This presentation describes, in a Goldilocks-style narrative, the evolution of an assignment for linguistics students in which they were asked to measure vowels from their own speech and to plot their measurements on a graph in order to re-create the standard organization of vowel sounds found in textbooks. The first, low-tech iteration required students to make their visualization using paper and pencil. The second, medium-tech iteration required students to use a familiar but restrictive software (Microsoft Excel). The third iteration required students to use the powerful but overwhelming statistical computing environment R. Finally, the fourth iteration required students to use an interactive, Web2.0-friendly application, which was easily created by the instructor using R, but required no knowledge of R by students. In the second half of the talk, we compare the different versions of the assignment according to the Best Practices for Quantitative Reasoning Instruction published by the Numeracy Infusion Course for Higher Education, including: real world applications and active learning, including discovery methods; pairing QR instruction with writing and critical reading; using technology, including computers; collaborative instruction and group work; pedagogy that is sensitive to differences in students' culture and learning styles; and scaffolding the learning process and providing rich feedback and opportunities for revision. Take-aways: Quantitative literacy (like other literacies) is important across the curriculum. High-tech research tools can and should be used for instruction, but may require modification to accommodate student skill level


Professor of Information Systems at the Silberman - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Turning Homework on its Head - Deeper Learning by Putting Students in Charge
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Michael Bieber (NJIT)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Participatory Learning (PL) engages students as active participants in the full life cycle of homework, projects and examination. PL’s core idea is that students design the questions or projects, execute them, and then assess and grade their peers’ solutions. Each stage can be performed by individuals or by teams. Students should be able to observe (read) everything their peers do so they can learn further from others’ efforts. Designing problems challenges students to critically assess understanding of a subject by their peers. This encourages students to analyze course materials in order to determine the most important aspects for this assessment. Evaluating solutions challenges students to assess how fully a set of materials (the solution) fits their understanding of the field as well as the problem posed. In this session we describe PL, present experimental results, and discuss compelling issues that arise including motivating students, assessing actual learning, learning to design and use rubrics, anonymity within online systems, trusting peers, contingency planning when students don’t participate, and what it takes for instructors to embrace the approach. This research is transformative. It combines various successful teaching approaches into a single framework and process. It brings a new approach to engaging and motivating students, and deepen their learning across course modes. We believe it will work in most types of courses including across the STEM fields; and possibly from junior high school through graduate education. It may solve some issues of engaging students within MOOCs (massive open online courses). The assessment and team work inherent within PL’s framework could enhance student’s interpersonal (soft) skills, better preparing them for the workplace. The deeper learning and motivation PL brings, even to topics that students previously have chosen to disengage with, may increase retention and articulation rates. Participatory Learning is supported by an on-line prototype infrastructure that facilitates the problem lifecycle tasks, underlying processes or “workflow” management, instructor activities and oversight, and ensuring anonymity throughout student interaction. Future extensions include group support, commenting and flagging, rating, and teaching students how to do their tasks (calibration).


Instructor of Business Communications, Political S - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Beyond the Text: Converging Current Events and Digital Technology
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Frank Longo (Centenary University)
Co-presenter: Lisa Johnston (Centenary University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Although today’s students are frequently inundated with information in a rapidly evolving society, the consumption of that information often comes without useful and appropriate context, making it challenging for students to establish connections and a strong sense of relevance. One of the most significant connections students can make are those between course content and real-world situations. Even the most well-crafted curricula, however, can lack the ability to bridge this gap and fall short of instilling a methodology for learners to effectively recognize the applicability of their studies. This presentation will argue that one of the most significant steps an instructor can take in reinforcing course themes and demonstrating their practical value is through the strategic integration of current events into the curriculum, particularly through the use of digital technology. This requires both an understanding of the theoretical framework behind digital current events integration and the practical steps involved in content implementation. The framework for such an approach centers on the promotion of student engagement, the enhancement of conventional and digital citizenship, and exploration of the real-world relevance of course material. Essential to this foundation is the understanding of how current events function in a classroom environment, including the promotion of currency and the encouragement of critical and analytical thinking. Utilizing digital tools to integrate this information allows for increased timeliness and the promotion of a form of digital citizenship that is deeply intertwined with the expansion of the student knowledge base. While this presentation will touch on a variety of ways to integrate current events into the classroom, it will focus primarily on the use of the faculty blog, an accessible and flexible medium for providing supplemental content while promoting student interaction and idea exchange. This model of blog goes well beyond the musings of conventional blogs to serve as a space for supplemental reading, relevant commentary, and essential parallels between course content and real-world events. It is an extension of the classroom space that seamlessly weaves together course content and the real and relevant dynamics of present-day news. While many publishing companies have increasingly aimed to keep electronic resources timely through the integration of stories or concepts from current events, they are not yet capable of utilizing stories from the day, week, or even month before. The proposed model of the faculty current events blog allows for the timely and relevant use of recent news and developments in a way that highlights and enhances the selected text and course materials. It also allows for better instructor adaptation of the course itself to the academic and professional needs of a diverse student population. This is text customization at its best and most innovative. The proposed presentation will ideally use a concurrent model with a combination lecture (40%), demonstration (35%), and discussion (25%). Participants will gain insights into the value of digital current events and many practical examples of how this form of instruction can be integrated into a classroom environment.


Director, Center for the Digital Humanities - Bio & Photo
Other
Welcome and Opening Remarks
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 8:30 AM to 8:45 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Co-presenter: AJ Kelton (College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Montclair State University)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 15min
Brief Abstract:

Welcome and Opening Remarks


Associate Vice President for Digital Education and - Bio & Photo
Collaborate General Session
Applying Lessons Learned from MOOCs to the Traditional Classroom (Data, Baby, Data!)
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Deborah Keyek-Franssen (University of Colorado System Office)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 30min
Brief Abstract:

A breathtakingly short hype cycle prematurely sounded the death knell for massive open online courses (MOOCs) while overlooking the value that they bring to the table: massive data that describe the convergence of teaching, learning, and technology at scale. The University of Colorado has been a Coursera partner since 2013 and, in the course of developing dozens of courses, specializations, and even for-credit certificates on the platform, has gleaned principles of learning design from the nearly 2 million learners who have signed up for its MOOCs. Analysis of data and Coursera’s own A/B testing has given hints about how to best retain and assess the learning of the largely “volunteer” learners in MOOCs. Many of these lessons in learning design at scale can and rightly should be applied to the design of face-to-face, hybrid, and “traditional” online courses. They also bear a striking resemblance to the basics of learning design: knowing the learning audience, knowing and contextualizing what they need to learn (and how we can best determine whether or not they’ve learned it), providing community and expert feedback and coaching.


Collaborate General Session
A Regional Response: Culmination of the Day’s Thinking and Invitation to Continue the Collaboration
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Co-presenters: Elliot King (Loyola University Maryland), Teresa Slobuski (San Josè State University), Deborah Keyek-Franssen (University of Colorado System Office)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Significant changes in digital education have brought about an opportunity for teaching, learning and technology to converge. Looking at the learning sciences, the 21st century library and the scalability of learning, we can identify best practices and opportunities to continue to create an effective learning environment for student. The day’s final session brings together the thoughts and conclusions generated from the OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design discussions to formulate a regional response to the changing educational environment. Topics gathered by OLC facilitators and session archivists during breakout sessions along with those posted online by participants during the day will be used to guide this interactive final session. Led by Jennifer Mathes from OLC, each of the day’s keynote speakers will have the opportunity to address the collectively generated questions and topics and place them in the context of the broader changes occurring in higher education. The OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design response will continue the contribution to a national discussion as the OLC Collaborate sessions continue across the country.


Professor and Chair - Department of Communication - Bio & Photo
Collaborate General Session
Aligning Research to the Classroom Experience
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 8:45 AM to 9:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Elliot King (Loyola University Maryland)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 30min
Brief Abstract:

How do people learn? That question is central to education and over the past 75 years, cognitive psychologist have identified many processes that greatly enhance learning outcomes. Starting from a basic definition of what constitutes learning, techniques to incorporate these findings from cognitive psychology in the students’ educational experience will be surveyed. The overview will be followed by a short examination of the initial attempts to use the data generated by online learning technologies such as learning management systems and adaptive learning programs to better understand the learning process.


Collaborate General Session
A Regional Response: Culmination of the Day’s Thinking and Invitation to Continue the Collaboration
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Co-presenters: Elliot King (Loyola University Maryland), Teresa Slobuski (San Josè State University), Deborah Keyek-Franssen (University of Colorado System Office)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Significant changes in digital education have brought about an opportunity for teaching, learning and technology to converge. Looking at the learning sciences, the 21st century library and the scalability of learning, we can identify best practices and opportunities to continue to create an effective learning environment for student. The day’s final session brings together the thoughts and conclusions generated from the OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design discussions to formulate a regional response to the changing educational environment. Topics gathered by OLC facilitators and session archivists during breakout sessions along with those posted online by participants during the day will be used to guide this interactive final session. Led by Jennifer Mathes from OLC, each of the day’s keynote speakers will have the opportunity to address the collectively generated questions and topics and place them in the context of the broader changes occurring in higher education. The OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design response will continue the contribution to a national discussion as the OLC Collaborate sessions continue across the country.


  • Keynote Address
Keynote Address
Applying the Principles of Learning Science to Online and Hybrid Course Design
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Elliot King (Loyola University Maryland)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

A fundamental axiom of online education is that teachers should not mechanically translate existing courses into an online format.  In that case,  how should new or ongoing courses be reshaped for the online environment? The answers come both from the nature of online education itself and from a body of research from cognitive psychology and cognitive science that provides insight in the way people actually learn.

Freed from the constraints of time and space, as well as the deeply ingrained expectations of both teachers and students, online and hybrid education provides a more flexible palette upon which evidence-based ideas about learning can be integrated into course structure and design.  The opportunity to deliver learning experiences that may result in measurably better outcomes  than in typical face-to-face only classrooms represents one of education’s greatest potential benefits.


Concurrent Session
The Specter of Edutainment: Re-emergent Mistakes & Opportunities
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Matthew Lee (University of Pennsylvania)
Co-presenter: Ronald D. Mina (University of Pennsylvania)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

In the headlong rush to adopt principles like game-based learning and gamification for classroom use, what often happens is that the elements of play, challenge and interactivity so central to successful games are lost, resulting in unengaging “learning app” in the spirit of the “educational CD’s” for which edutainment is remembered today. This is an existential danger for the current cycle of learning games, given that non-existent core gameplay and a diluted focus on learning content were also what made late-era edutainment games neither educational nor particularly entertaining. Indeed, the state of learning games today closely parallels the age of edutainment, which focused on leveraging both new technologies (like personal computer & CDs) and collaborations between educators and developers to create new, more engaging ways of disseminating content. In the 1980s, this convergence of learning, technology, and play resulted in iconic franchises like Oregon Trail and Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? whose balance of challenge and interactive learning lent them a status beyond being merely entertainment - or merely educational. This spirit of collaboration and discovery also inspired franchises such as SimCity and Age of Empires in the traditional games industry, both of which were well-regarded for their educational content, and were highly successful on the commercial market.In today’s world, for all our literature on best practices and focus on curricula, standards, and connected learning methodologies, as well as a much larger game-playing audience, no app has managed to replicate the success of these decades-old games. In fact, it is likely that today’s entertainment-focused games have done more for education than any current educational title! This panel, primarily aimed at educators and developers, aims to correct this by looking into the commonalities behind the age of edutainment and today’s learning games ecosystem, examining both the critical mistakes being repeated today, as well as how the delicate balance of educational content and engaging gameplay early edutainment espoused not only made early games successful, but has implications for the future development of learning games in the 21st century. Intended Structure: This session is envisioned as a concurrent session (panel), with the 45 minutes structured accordingly. 5 minutes: Panelist Intros 5 minutes: Relevant Background of “edutainment” 25 minute game demos / interactive discussion 10 minutes Q&A Outcomes: Attendees will learn how the state of learning games today closely parallels the early age of edutainment, as well as how many of edutainment’s mistakes are being intentionally - or unintentionally - repeated in the modern era. Attendees will also be given core examples of what went into developing some of the most successful edutainment games, and what practices and lessons they can implement in their own work, with a particular focus on designing for hardware constraints, addressing short attention spans, and how to balance core gameplay with education in and out of the classroom, drawing on re-emergent thinking from an era that fostered interactivity, engagement, and long-term learning.


Educational Technology Specialist - Bio & Photo
  • Workshop
Workshop
Creating Short Educational Videos: A Streamlined Process for Beginners
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Katelyn Lemay (New York University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

With the increased popularity of the flipped classroom as of late, multimedia content, specifically video, is becoming a standard part of the classroom experience. According to a 2015 whitepaper from SAGE, 68% of students watch videos as part of their coursework and 79% of students voluntarily watch videos (not assigned by the instructor) to enhance their understanding of a topic. Similarly, a 2016 survey of teachers, instructional designers, and other education professionals by Kaltura showed that 93% feel video has a positive impact on student satisfaction, while 88% feel video boosts student achievement levels. Though students expect video to be a part of their learning experience, they admit to having short attention spans. The SAGE study found that students on average do not watch a single video for more than 10 minutes, and they tend to multitask (i.e., use a second browser window or screen) while a video plays. At the same time, instructors are hesitant to create video content because there is the perception that one must be a professional video producer in order to do so. They fear investing a lot of time and resources into something that will be ultimately ignored by students. This workshop outlines a workflow for creating simple yet effective PowerPoint + narration videos. Participants learn basic principles of multimedia design and digital storytelling techniques, and learn to use that knowledge to present academic content in comprehensible, compelling short-form videos. The workshop also provides a survey of free and low-cost tools for recording, editing, and publishing media. A quick demonstration will be followed by hands-on practice with recording narration and editing a video. Finally, we will explore possibilities for video in the classroom beyond flipped lectures including assistance for non-native speakers and students with disabilities, student projects, and more.


Assistant Professor of Business - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Beyond the Text: Converging Current Events and Digital Technology
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Frank Longo (Centenary University)
Co-presenter: Lisa Johnston (Centenary University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Although today’s students are frequently inundated with information in a rapidly evolving society, the consumption of that information often comes without useful and appropriate context, making it challenging for students to establish connections and a strong sense of relevance. One of the most significant connections students can make are those between course content and real-world situations. Even the most well-crafted curricula, however, can lack the ability to bridge this gap and fall short of instilling a methodology for learners to effectively recognize the applicability of their studies. This presentation will argue that one of the most significant steps an instructor can take in reinforcing course themes and demonstrating their practical value is through the strategic integration of current events into the curriculum, particularly through the use of digital technology. This requires both an understanding of the theoretical framework behind digital current events integration and the practical steps involved in content implementation. The framework for such an approach centers on the promotion of student engagement, the enhancement of conventional and digital citizenship, and exploration of the real-world relevance of course material. Essential to this foundation is the understanding of how current events function in a classroom environment, including the promotion of currency and the encouragement of critical and analytical thinking. Utilizing digital tools to integrate this information allows for increased timeliness and the promotion of a form of digital citizenship that is deeply intertwined with the expansion of the student knowledge base. While this presentation will touch on a variety of ways to integrate current events into the classroom, it will focus primarily on the use of the faculty blog, an accessible and flexible medium for providing supplemental content while promoting student interaction and idea exchange. This model of blog goes well beyond the musings of conventional blogs to serve as a space for supplemental reading, relevant commentary, and essential parallels between course content and real-world events. It is an extension of the classroom space that seamlessly weaves together course content and the real and relevant dynamics of present-day news. While many publishing companies have increasingly aimed to keep electronic resources timely through the integration of stories or concepts from current events, they are not yet capable of utilizing stories from the day, week, or even month before. The proposed model of the faculty current events blog allows for the timely and relevant use of recent news and developments in a way that highlights and enhances the selected text and course materials. It also allows for better instructor adaptation of the course itself to the academic and professional needs of a diverse student population. This is text customization at its best and most innovative. The proposed presentation will ideally use a concurrent model with a combination lecture (40%), demonstration (35%), and discussion (25%). Participants will gain insights into the value of digital current events and many practical examples of how this form of instruction can be integrated into a classroom environment.


Chief Executive Officer - Bio & Photo
Other
Welcome and Opening Remarks
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 8:30 AM to 8:45 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Co-presenter: AJ Kelton (College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Montclair State University)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 15min
Brief Abstract:

Welcome and Opening Remarks


Collaborate General Session
A Regional Response: Culmination of the Day’s Thinking and Invitation to Continue the Collaboration
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Co-presenters: Elliot King (Loyola University Maryland), Teresa Slobuski (San Josè State University), Deborah Keyek-Franssen (University of Colorado System Office)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Significant changes in digital education have brought about an opportunity for teaching, learning and technology to converge. Looking at the learning sciences, the 21st century library and the scalability of learning, we can identify best practices and opportunities to continue to create an effective learning environment for student. The day’s final session brings together the thoughts and conclusions generated from the OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design discussions to formulate a regional response to the changing educational environment. Topics gathered by OLC facilitators and session archivists during breakout sessions along with those posted online by participants during the day will be used to guide this interactive final session. Led by Jennifer Mathes from OLC, each of the day’s keynote speakers will have the opportunity to address the collectively generated questions and topics and place them in the context of the broader changes occurring in higher education. The OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design response will continue the contribution to a national discussion as the OLC Collaborate sessions continue across the country.


Concurrent Session
Keeping the Focus on Quality in the Digital Learning Environment
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

In 2011, the Online Learning Consortium, known for the Five Pillars for Quality Online Education, introduced the Quality Scorecard for the Administration of Online Programs to support institutions looking for a research-based tool that could be used to comprehensively assess the effectiveness of an online program. Since launching the scorecard (and updating it in 2014), hundreds of higher education institutions across the country (and around the world) have used the tool to quantify measures of quality. Recognizing a need to take a deeper dive into critical indicators, the OLC has recently introduced more resources in the Suite of Quality Scorecards to evaluate course design, faculty engagement, and other areas Educational institutions can use these free tools to effectively evaluate and validate the quality of an online or blended learning program to accreditors, regulators, and other stakeholders. Using the research-based, Quality Scorecard also provides institutions with best practices from experts in the field that can be used when building a new program or sustaining an existing one. Participants will learn how these resources can be implemented at their own institution.


Fulltime clinical faculty member - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Innovative Project Based Teaching and Learning Experiences Infusing Literacy
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Pankowski (Pace University)
Co-presenter: Sharon Medow (Pace University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

TBA


Editorial Director of AFKer games - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
The Specter of Edutainment: Re-emergent Mistakes & Opportunities
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Matthew Lee (University of Pennsylvania)
Co-presenter: Ronald D. Mina (University of Pennsylvania)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

In the headlong rush to adopt principles like game-based learning and gamification for classroom use, what often happens is that the elements of play, challenge and interactivity so central to successful games are lost, resulting in unengaging “learning app” in the spirit of the “educational CD’s” for which edutainment is remembered today. This is an existential danger for the current cycle of learning games, given that non-existent core gameplay and a diluted focus on learning content were also what made late-era edutainment games neither educational nor particularly entertaining. Indeed, the state of learning games today closely parallels the age of edutainment, which focused on leveraging both new technologies (like personal computer & CDs) and collaborations between educators and developers to create new, more engaging ways of disseminating content. In the 1980s, this convergence of learning, technology, and play resulted in iconic franchises like Oregon Trail and Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? whose balance of challenge and interactive learning lent them a status beyond being merely entertainment - or merely educational. This spirit of collaboration and discovery also inspired franchises such as SimCity and Age of Empires in the traditional games industry, both of which were well-regarded for their educational content, and were highly successful on the commercial market.In today’s world, for all our literature on best practices and focus on curricula, standards, and connected learning methodologies, as well as a much larger game-playing audience, no app has managed to replicate the success of these decades-old games. In fact, it is likely that today’s entertainment-focused games have done more for education than any current educational title! This panel, primarily aimed at educators and developers, aims to correct this by looking into the commonalities behind the age of edutainment and today’s learning games ecosystem, examining both the critical mistakes being repeated today, as well as how the delicate balance of educational content and engaging gameplay early edutainment espoused not only made early games successful, but has implications for the future development of learning games in the 21st century. Intended Structure: This session is envisioned as a concurrent session (panel), with the 45 minutes structured accordingly. 5 minutes: Panelist Intros 5 minutes: Relevant Background of “edutainment” 25 minute game demos / interactive discussion 10 minutes Q&A Outcomes: Attendees will learn how the state of learning games today closely parallels the early age of edutainment, as well as how many of edutainment’s mistakes are being intentionally - or unintentionally - repeated in the modern era. Attendees will also be given core examples of what went into developing some of the most successful edutainment games, and what practices and lessons they can implement in their own work, with a particular focus on designing for hardware constraints, addressing short attention spans, and how to balance core gameplay with education in and out of the classroom, drawing on re-emergent thinking from an era that fostered interactivity, engagement, and long-term learning.


Classics Department - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Rome Research Project: Students and Digital Faculty Research
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: John Muccigrosso (Drew University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Two liberal-arts-college faculty working on Rome, but from different disciplinary perspectives and in different periods, have both settled on an approach to their research material that involves the creation of a database including geographic information as an important component. Both treat the architectural manifestation of religious practice in the past: in one case, the temples of ancient Rome, in the other street shrines from the medieval to the modern. Students were involved in the creation of the databases as part of standard courses on the historical cultures as well as special courses that focused on the database, including one three-week study-abroad course in Rome. In the summer of 2016 both projects were involved in a special "institute" on the digital humanities which intentionally involved students in faculty-led research projects. Participants, faculty and student, meet for weekly updates in an effort to share both methods and results and to strengthen intra-institutional ties among faculty doing Digital Humanities (DH). The institute also led to increased collaboration within the institution in the form of both presenters being included as "clients" for a Computer-Science colleague's advanced computer-programming course. These CSCI class projects were tied to the main projects being presented here, but also with some other research interests. The presentation will include a discussion of how the databases were constructed and are currently being expanded. The interactive mapping component of each project will be demonstrated with an explanation of the digital tools that were used for both the database and the mapping elements. The challenges of working with students on humanities and DH research projects will be discussed, including some preliminary thoughts on the collaboration with Computer Science. The audience will (hopefully) learn something about the particular challenges of DH work at small schools, some of the available (free!) tools that even humanists can use, and the opportunities for collaboration between colleagues in the humanities and the STEM disciplines. Not everything worked well, so we plan to offer some cautionary tales as well as success stories.


veteran educator, administrator, teacher trainer a - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Students' Choice: Personalized Learning in Online Courses
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Deborah Nagler (New Jersey City University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

One-size-fits-all models for online instruction do not meet the needs of diverse learners. This session invites the examination of a responsive instructional design approach that customizes each student’s learning path, addressing individual strengths, needs, and interests. Participants will “walk through” and discuss a template for the development of an online course facilitating personalized learning. The methodology presented in this session applies a constructivist approach to learning that is learner-centered. The template to be presented is an amalgam of a number of online higher education courses taught by the presenter, along with those she participated in as a doctoral candidate at NJCU. In addition, the presenter has served as an Instructional Designer for an online college for the past five years.While the session is designed to present a model of overall personalization of an online college course, participants will also be encouraged to consider the methodology as transferable in part – as a unit within a course, or as enhancements within existing practice. Participants will be given the opportunity to reflect and react on the issues that emerge from implementation of this model, including the those of subject matter, class size, and course requirements. The presenter has designed a course based on the personalized learning template that is scheduled for summer 2017.


Concurrent Session
Innovative Project Based Teaching and Learning Experiences Infusing Literacy
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Pankowski (Pace University)
Co-presenter: Sharon Medow (Pace University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

TBA


  • Workshop
Workshop
Using Empathetic Design Thinking to Fuel Your Learning Experience Designs
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Angela Barrus Payne (Pearson Learning Experience Design)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

As the world of work continues to evolve and 21st century skills such as communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity remain vital differentiators for competitive career development opportunities, learners must be prepared to take personal responsibility for their learning process and outcomes. In order to support this focus on career readiness, learning designs must move beyond a focus on knowledge acquisition to transferrable skill development no matter the content focus. This session will focus on leveraging the design thinking process to inform learner-centered experiences that encourage and support effective learning strategy development and use to inform ongoing professional skill development. In this session we will: 1. Define design thinking 2. Discover how learner empathy informs learning design 3. Demonstrate a shift in learning design concepting from a focus on content to a focus on learner needs, wants and professional outcomes including scaffolding professional skill development. 4. Practice with a brief hands-on approach aligning learner needs and wants to evidence-based design concepts using empathy practices. At the conclusion of this session, attendees will be prepared to continue to learn about and apply design thinking practices to learning experience design. Attendees will also be invited to use their new skills to become increasingly more confident in more efficiently and effectively understanding learner needs and using that information to inform impactful curricular designs.


Emerging Technology Analyst - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Virtual Reality Technologies in the Classroom
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Olga Scrivner (Indiana University)
Co-presenters: Cameron Buckley (Indiana University), Nitocris Perez (Indiana University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Virtual reality has a great potential as an educational tool in classroom settings. By adding a spatial dimension to the learning environment, this technology makes it possible to introduce three-dimensional authentic experiences to students without leaving a classroom. The use of these technologies in education, however, remains limited due to technological and methodological challenges. In this workshop, we will introduce a user-friendly methodology for creating VR classroom materials. This method consists of videos recorded with 360-degree camera and converted via youtube into VR format. Participants will be provided with a set of Google cardboard viewers (two participants per a viewer) and instructions how to upload and prepare videos for VR use. Using their mobile devices attendees will experience a short authentic video, converted to VR format prior workshop, as the conversion time may take up to an hour. We will also demonstrate our VR experiment in a language classroom. In addition to VR conversion, we augmented language videos using Unity 5. By adding additional layers with audio and quizzes, these videos offer more options for classroom activities and evaluation. Workshop Details: First we will introduce participants to the hardware and software required to create and use VR, namely 360 kodak camera, VR viewers, and conversion process. The initial demo will expose participants to the complete process of making a panoramic video, uploading to youtube, converting, and viewing it as a VR video. In the second part of the workshop, each group of participants (two per a group) will select and view videos from youtube. Finally, we will demonstrate augmented videos created with Unity and discuss best practices of using VR in classroom.


Assistant Professor and Director of the Games & Em - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Civic Engagement and Design: Connecting Students with the Local Community
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Karen Schrier (Marist College)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

College and high school students are generally considered to be one of the least civically engaged populations. For instance, they report lower voting rates, less participation in civic meetings or town hall events, and may not be as engaged in their local communities, such as through volunteer work. In this short talk, I describe one possible intervention to support greater civic engagement, civic interest, and civic awareness by college students. This intervention involves working with students to connect with local non-profits to support their needs through design. Students work in teams on “design-based” projects, where they create documentation and prototypes for an application, website or game that fits the needs, audience, and goals of a particular non-profit in the local community. In this talk, I share the specific process used for the design project, as well as the materials, guidelines, tasks and assessments used. I outline the problems and pitfalls that were experienced by students and real-world non-profit “clients,” and possible issues to consider before connecting students with outside organizations. I also discuss the importance of and connection among design thinking and civic engagement, and the ways that co-creation can help students more fully understand the needs of the local community. As part of the talk, I will first introduce participants to the concepts of design thinking and civic engagement and potential interrelationships. Next, I will describe my particular intervention with college students, which involves co-creating applications and websites for local “real-world” non-profit “clients,” and the process, materials and assessments involved in this. Finally, I will walk participants through a “mock” design thinking exercise to put into practice the process of creating an application, and brainstorm with the participants possible issues and solutions with this type of intervention. Participants can expect to receive an innovative approach to teaching civic engagement that can be incorporated into their own teaching, and will also receive sample materials (such as assignments, tasks, assessments, rubrics) that can be used in their own classrooms and educational venues. Finally, participants will receive a list of tools and software that can be used in this type of intervention/course and the pros and cons of each.


Concurrent Session
Using Games to Support Inclusive Classrooms - A Panel Discussion
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Karen Schrier (Marist College)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

How do we incorporate critical questions and uncomfortable issues, while maintaining an inclusive and comfortable classroom? In this panel presentation, panelists will share games, activities, exercises, and assessments that can be used to spur the critical consideration of cultural and ethical issues. We will also discuss some of the general requirements for addressing effective conversation in the classroom, such as encouraging active listening, building trust in the room, and tactics for engaging in positive confrontation and positive disagreement. In this panel, we will discuss, and at times disagree, about some of the questions to ask, techniques to use, topics to broach, and successes achieved in challenging students' perspectives as they relate to cultural competency, ethics, empathy and games. We will consider, specifically, which learning objectives and questions are most critical, and which games, examples, readings, tasks, exercises, assessments, and pedagogical techniques can support these goals. While the specific ethics-related topics that are most relevant and most difficult to discuss change over time, they are often notable for inciting controversy and even discomfort in the classroom. However, this discomfort can often foster more inclusive dialogue, practices and design considerations. Current examples of topics include systemic bias and representations of gender, race, class, sexual identity, and disability in games; empathy and emotion; harassment and bullying, and transgressive play, and discussions of ethics in games journalism and #gamergate. Other examples include incorporating independent games and commercial games that challenge and introduce different social experiences and new mechanics centered on them; for example, games like Dys4ia and Triad, which remix traditional game mechanics in novel ways to understand and think about sexuality and transgendered experience. Such topics often invite controversy and even discomfort for students (and educators). Techniques will be shared on how to best support an inclusive classroom for critical conversations and reflection. The presentation will share specific learning objectives, challenges, best practices, and questions related to incorporating ethics and cultural critique using games in the classroom. It will provide illustrative examples, "wins" and "fails," exercises and techniques, assessment tools, and tips on how to support effective conversation, such as encouraging active listening, trust, and constructive disagreement. The panel (anonymized) will be comprised of experienced educators who incorporate games into their classrooms, and consider how best to support inclusive classrooms. Some questions we may discuss include: What are some ways K-12 educators and college educators can use games to create more inclusive and equitable learning and development environments? How do we effectively talk about race and inclusion, belongingness and empathy through games? How do we best discuss and probe topics such as sexuality, identity, or gender through games? How do we help our students confront their presumptions or biases without losing their attention (or worse)? How can we foster dialogue and multiple perspectives using games to create more inclusive learning environments? What are some cases of successful or unsuccessful classroom activities around games and culturally responsive design?


Visiting Lecturer in Spanish and Portuguese Depart - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
Virtual Reality Technologies in the Classroom
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Olga Scrivner (Indiana University)
Co-presenters: Cameron Buckley (Indiana University), Nitocris Perez (Indiana University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Virtual reality has a great potential as an educational tool in classroom settings. By adding a spatial dimension to the learning environment, this technology makes it possible to introduce three-dimensional authentic experiences to students without leaving a classroom. The use of these technologies in education, however, remains limited due to technological and methodological challenges. In this workshop, we will introduce a user-friendly methodology for creating VR classroom materials. This method consists of videos recorded with 360-degree camera and converted via youtube into VR format. Participants will be provided with a set of Google cardboard viewers (two participants per a viewer) and instructions how to upload and prepare videos for VR use. Using their mobile devices attendees will experience a short authentic video, converted to VR format prior workshop, as the conversion time may take up to an hour. We will also demonstrate our VR experiment in a language classroom. In addition to VR conversion, we augmented language videos using Unity 5. By adding additional layers with audio and quizzes, these videos offer more options for classroom activities and evaluation. Workshop Details: First we will introduce participants to the hardware and software required to create and use VR, namely 360 kodak camera, VR viewers, and conversion process. The initial demo will expose participants to the complete process of making a panoramic video, uploading to youtube, converting, and viewing it as a VR video. In the second part of the workshop, each group of participants (two per a group) will select and view videos from youtube. Finally, we will demonstrate augmented videos created with Unity and discuss best practices of using VR in classroom.


Professor of Games Design - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
MarsU: A Statistics Game to Supplement Learning
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: David Simkins
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

MarsU: This project introduces a web-based game for learning developed generally to enhance learning of statistics concepts among visual learners, and specifically to improve learning outcomes for deaf and hard of hearing students. The game is intended to be played by students in a statistics course, and is considered a supplemental exercise to help support and enhance learning. The game focuses on the first concepts in introductory statistics, population and sample. While maintaining that focus, it by necessity touches on many other statistical concepts including probability and statistical inference. The game stands on its own, but the hope is to develop a series of games that will supplement the entire semester curriculum in introductory statistics. The game takes place on Mars University, or MarsU, where the player, an incoming student, seeks to propel her chosen candidate to win the student government presidential election. The game uses realistic statistical formulas and modeling to produce polls of student voters, allowing students to target their marketing to specific groups and to poll targeted or general student body polls to further refine their campaign. Increasingly learning games researchers are looking to develop games within or to work with curriculum. While multimodal learning is an effective teaching tool, it is most effective when applied to complex concepts and systems (Mitiri Group, 2008). Learning games that incorporate role play are generally themselves more complex systems requiring more time to learn the game, which can enhance but can also interfere with learning (author). The goal of this game is to make use of the advantages of digital role play and complex, contextual systems to give players enjoyable, engaging, and playful to learn. Structure: This talk and demonstration will show the game while walking through the process of development. If we have the opportunity for hands-on play and discussion, that would be best. Otherwise, this can be conducted as a talk with the game used to highlight features of learning design. Takeaway: The goal of this presentation is to highlight some of the affordances of learning game design in this environment, particularly in taking a STEM subject and presenting it for visually-dominant learners (visual learners and DHH students). We will also discuss some of the challenges in this approach to learning, including scope creep, focus on learning goals, and the effort to create playtesting possibilities to enhance the learning opportunities and level of engagement in the game.


Concurrent Session
Using Role Play in the Higher Ed Classroom
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: David Simkins
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Graduate students in an industry-focused game development masters program should be looking not only to their next job in industry, but also to their career trajectory. To facilitate development of industry leaders, we have incorporated a processes course that introduces game development skills along with introductions to publication, contracting, legal issues, business development, management, and other concerns that can practically influence the development of games. While texts address the issues presented, the students generally have limited background beyond the technical and design skills involved in game production. This research project involved the introduction of role play to provide context and limited consequence to learning about game production. This study uses qualitative analysis of classroom activities along with assignments and student feedback to discern the effectiveness of the inclusion of this kind of role play to introduce important new concepts into higher ed classrooms. Based on the work of the Harvard Negotiations Project (Fisher & Ury, 1997), as well as authors in learning with and through role play (Van Ments, 1999; Carnes, 2014; author), this mixed-methods work uses a variety of techniques for the purposes of data triangulation including ground-up thematic coding (Boyatzis, 1998) and discourse analysis (Johnstone, 2008). The analysis discusses the structure of the role play intervention to help support the use of this technique in other classrooms and contexts, and it characterizes some key successes to this approach as well as some limitations and concerns that should be addressed when implementing it. Structure: This talk will be roughly in thirds. The first will be the structure of this particular intervention. The second will be the data gathering and analytic methods and results. The third will be practical outcomes for those who would use role play as a tool in their higher education classroom. Outcomes: The audience will hear an argument for when and how to use role play in the classroom with a focus on one context, but applications that extend to many other contexts. They will also learn some of the struggles encountered by this group when implementing role play in a classroom of students not accustomed to role play.


Director of Online Experiential Learning Programs - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
A Technologist's Identity: Fostering Diversity in Learning
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Ke'Anna Skipwith (Northeastern University)
Co-presenter: C.L. Eddins (Berkeley College)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

This session will discuss the lack of diversity and other key issues in the field of instructional design. A case study will be used to highlight the strategies and examples to support why having a more diverse approach can assist with teaching and learning. The presenters will also share recent findings, diversity initiatives, and approaches to course design. Structure of the session: Online learning has transformed teaching and learning to the point where it has now become a normal form of education. The evolution of online learning has created a larger diverse population among its educators and learners. Behind the scenes, there could be a lack of progression for diversity in the field of instructional design. The presenters will explore the strategies for increasing diversity within instructional design and how it affects the increasing diversity among instructors and learners. The importance of improving diversity among instructional designers can positivity influence course development and design to ensure both instructors and learners feel comfortable with how the course is delivered. The session will begin with 10 minutes of sharing the data from a recent diversity survey that was conducted by the presenters and sent to instructional designers across multiple institutions. Using a small group discussion format, participants will have the opportunity to interact with the presenters for 15 minutes to learn about different diversity initiatives and how it has influenced and impacted their course design process. Examples from a case study and effective strategies will also be presented to the participants. The final 20 minutes of the session will be interactive: the participants will work actively in small groups, and "practice" creating or revising existing course materials with a diversity-design approach facilitated by the presenters. Outcomes/Takeaways: The outcomes for this session are to: Identify key diversity issues in instructional design and curriculum development Create a diverse learning framework for online course design Adapt a cross-cultural design experience to align with learning outcomes and online learning environment


Research Services Coordinator - Bio & Photo
Collaborate General Session
The 21st Century Library as Classroom Learning Partner
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 10:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Teresa Slobuski (San Josè State University)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 30min
Brief Abstract:

Libraries and Librarians on the User-Centered Bleeding Edge.  As institutions with a history stretching further back than university or public school systems, many see libraries as static entities. The Library of Alexandria collected, held, and made available the knowledge of the day, and so too do libraries now. However, libraries are increasingly involved in all manner of trends. Since libraries are generally not required to follow rigid curricula, in most academic institutions they have the freedom to explore new tools and technology as they become available. In this session, we will explore the work librarians and libraries are doing and how it can relate to larger educational goals. Libraries are leading the charge for Open Access, Makerspaces, Institutional Repositories, Alt-Metrics, and more, while still continuing the emphasis on user-centered service both in person and via remote access, which means everyone can learn something from the library.


Collaborate General Session
A Regional Response: Culmination of the Day’s Thinking and Invitation to Continue the Collaboration
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 2:45 PM to 3:45 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Jennifer Mathes (Online Learning Consortium)
Co-presenters: Elliot King (Loyola University Maryland), Teresa Slobuski (San Josè State University), Deborah Keyek-Franssen (University of Colorado System Office)
Track: N/A
Location: UH 1070
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Significant changes in digital education have brought about an opportunity for teaching, learning and technology to converge. Looking at the learning sciences, the 21st century library and the scalability of learning, we can identify best practices and opportunities to continue to create an effective learning environment for student. The day’s final session brings together the thoughts and conclusions generated from the OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design discussions to formulate a regional response to the changing educational environment. Topics gathered by OLC facilitators and session archivists during breakout sessions along with those posted online by participants during the day will be used to guide this interactive final session. Led by Jennifer Mathes from OLC, each of the day’s keynote speakers will have the opportunity to address the collectively generated questions and topics and place them in the context of the broader changes occurring in higher education. The OLC Collaborate with Emerging Learning Design response will continue the contribution to a national discussion as the OLC Collaborate sessions continue across the country.


SPARKS!
With the Dice in the Library: Tabletop Games and Culture
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Teresa Slobuski (San Josè State University)
Track: N/A
Location: 7th Fl Conference Center
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Nearly everyone has played some form of tabletop game in their life, whether dice, board, or card games. Indeed, the archaeological record shows humans have been playing games for at least 4000 years and have been an important socialization tool throughout this history. (Murray, H.J.R., 1952). As institutions that assemble artifacts of culture for future generations, libraries can and should include games in their collections. Indeed, some libraries have supported games and play for over a century, first documented when a chess club met at a library in San Francisco in the mid-1800’s (Nicholson, 2013). The early 20th century saw the emergence of toy libraries, established to support families in need by lending toys, board games, and other realia that support play (Moore, 1995). Today, more and more libraries are including tabletop games in their collections. In this session you will learn more about the history of games and their inclusion in library collections. You will also learn how tabletop/physical games can remain relevant and even thrive in our increasingly digital culture. Games and play are usually the first way humans and animals learn, so by understanding and engaging with the history of games participants may better conceive how games can fit into their teaching.


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Sciences - Breakout C: Aha! Applying Learning Sciences to Course Design
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                 


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Sciences - Breakout D: Why Do We Care About Learning Sciences?
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

             


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Sciences - Breakout B: Impact on the Selection of Teaching Approaches and its Implications
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Sciences - Breakout A: The Role of the Library in Learning and Learning Design: From Staplers to Serendipity
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 9:30 AM to 10:15 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                        


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Resources - Breakout C: Collaborating with the Library in Course Design
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

               


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Resources - Breakout D: Innovation or Customer Service – What Can Today’s Library Do For Me?
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                    


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Resources - Breakout B: Open Access in Scholarship and Publication
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                  


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Resources - Breakout A: Something Old, Something New: How We Work with the Modern Academy
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 11:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Design - Breakout C: Developing Connective Tissue and Context in Course Design
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

               


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Design - Breakout D: MOOCs are Dead! Long Live the MOOC!
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

            


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Design - Breakout B: Instructional Presence When You’re Not Looking Them Right in the Eye
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

             


Collaborate Breakout Session
Learning Design - Breakout A: Curating Learning Materials When Fair Use Isn’t an Option
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 45min
Brief Abstract:

                 


Other
Game Night
Date: Wednesday, May 31st
Time: 4:30 PM to 6:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: CRC 1140
Session Duration: 2hr
Brief Abstract:

Emerging Learning Design is pleased to host its first Game Night.  Join us at Wednesday at 4:30pm, or select the Campus Tour and Site Visit route that concludes at the Game Night.  Come and play your favorite games, or learn new ones.  We’ll have favorite board games, educational games, card games, and video games.  Come to play, watch others play, or hang out and have a good time.  This event is free and open to all conference attendees.


Cohort Group
Instructional Design Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Instructional Design Cohort Meeting


Cohort Group
Games & Learning/Gamification Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1121
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Games & Learning/Gamification Cohorrt Meeting


Cohort Group
Librarian Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Librarian Cohort Meeting


Cohort Group
Instructor Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1143
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Instructor Cohort Meeting


Cohort Group
Digital Humanities Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1145
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Digital Humanities Cohort Meeting


Cohort Group
MakerSpace/Fablab Cohort Meeting
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: CRC 1140
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

MakerSpace/Fablab Cohort Meeting


Other
After Party
Date: Friday, June 2nd
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Conference Staff (Online Learning Consortium)
Track: N/A
Location: CRC 1140
Session Duration: 1hr 30min
Brief Abstract:

What better way to end the conference than with colleagues, new friends, and an open bar (and food!).  Enjoy beer, wine, soft drinks and sparkling water from the bar, and a hot and cold Hors D'Oeuvre station - including cheese & crackers, quesadillas, crudite, coconut shrimp, and spinach and feta phyllo.  Join special guests AJ Kelton, Deb Keyek-Franssen, Elliott King, Jennifer Mathes, and Teresa Slobuski.  The After Party runs Friday from 2pm-3:30pm.  Must be 21 or older to attend.  Cost: $33

 


Concurrent Session
What Students Reported They Learned by Playing Role Playing Games
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: M.O. Thirunarayanan (Florida International University)
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1120
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

A survey of students was conducted in a large public research university that is located in a metropolitan area of the United States. The proposed presentation will discuss the results of the survey regarding what students reported that they learned as a result of playing role playing games. The proposed presentation will highlight the results of the survey for about 50 percent of the time and then initiate a discussion for the remaining 50% of the allotted time.m Participants will be encouraged to share their thoughts and ideas regarding the results of the survey that will be presented during the first half of the proposed presentation. Participants will find out what skills students reportedly learned as a result of playing role playing games and also be able to share their ideas and thoughts with the presenter and others who attend the session


Web Services and Multi Media Librarian - Bio & Photo
Concurrent Session
What's Mine is YOURLS
Date: Thursday, June 1st
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Session Modality: No
Lead Presenter: Kimberly Abrams (New York City College of Technology - CUNY)
Co-presenter: Junior Tidal (New York City College of Technology
Track: N/A
Location: ADP 1142
Session Duration: 60min
Brief Abstract:

Hyperlink management is critical to website functionality because a site with dead links is not fully operable for the end user. In educational institutions links used for marketing, course materials, library resources, social media, and other uses are laborious to maintain and often these links are long and unreadable. In order to streamline link maintenance and improve link readability for end users, an open source, short link manager called YOURLS was implemented at an academic library. Not only does YOURLS shorten links, it also acts as a database of links and as a link manager. Long URLs are then shortened into compact readable formats on a hosted domain. With YOURLS, URL updates for existing resources can be done in one place, negating the need to update all instances of a URL on different platforms. Short links are easier to remember and can be used in various forms of promotion through social media, email, and printed material. Session Structure: The timing of the session will be as follows: 25 minutes lecture, 10 minutes exercise, and 5 minutes question and answer. We will first focus on the challenges of managing hyperlinks in the various content and learning management systems that educators use. Then we will show how to set-up a short link server and create a short domain (which further assists with the utility of short links). The short link server and domain was implemented to streamline access for our users and improve the link maintenance workflow. We will then demonstrate the types of statistics that can be pulled from YOURLs to show how the links are redirected. Following this, we will have an exercise by which each participant creates a short link and share it with another participant vocally, in writing, through email, or on social media. Lastly, we will give suggestions on how to implement a short link server at other institutions. Outcomes: Participants will learn the benefits of a short link server in an educational environment, have hands-on experience in creating and sharing short links, as well as understand the steps necessary to implement a short link domain and server.