Are you Committing Assumicide in your Online Course?

Concurrent Session 1
Streamed Session

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Session Materials

Brief Abstract

Faculty make assumptions related to students, curriculum and teaching styles.  Assumptions can cause both student and faculty frustration, ultimately resulting in dissatisfaction. This session will focus on how to overcome problematic beliefs/assumptions related to students, such as: this is a 100/200/300 level course, all students should know APA, etc.

Extended Abstract

According to the work of Johanna Rauhala (2017), “Beliefs we have about how we should operate or how students should behave can sometimes cloud our vision, preventing us from seeing who stands before us”. Both new and veteran faculty can hold such beliefs (aka making assumptions) that cause frustration on the part of students and themselves.  Frustration can also lead to faculty burnout. This session will focus on how to overcome problematic beliefs/assumptions related to students, such as this is a 100/200/300 level course; all students should know APA, etcetera.  As educators, assumptions made about our students, and ourselves can impede our growth and their learning (Stanfield, n.d.).

Session Goals:

Individuals attending this education session will have the opportunity to reflect on and share their assumptions made as an online educator and leave with best practices to make fewer assumptions.  There will be a discussion on how assumptions can impede learning and increase levels of frustration on the part of students and faculty.  This interactive session will use gamification and audience contribution.  The session’s goal is to provide educators with best practices on how to avoid committing assumicide in online courses.  

The session will start with a definition of the term assumicide.  The definition will lead to why it is important to be aware of the implications making assumptions have on student and faculty satisfaction.  To prompt interaction in the session, the game Kahoot will be played, identifying how many participants have made assumptions related to specific focus areas. Once the game is completed, the facilitators will prompt an interactive discussion on the types of assumptions made by faculty in online courses.  More specifically, the discussion will focus on:

  • Assumptions faculty have to teaching online
  • Assumptions faculty have about students
  • Assumptions faculty have about faculty

The facilitators will share best practices on how to make fewer assumptions related to all of the focus areas with an opportunity for discussion and audience contribution. Best practices shared will be provided in written format (available by email or uploaded to the conference website).

 

References

Rauhala, J. (2017, November 10). 3 Assumptions teachers should avoid. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/article/3-assumptions-teachers-should-avoid

Stanfield, J. (n.d.). 8 Assumptions teachers make & why you should avoid them. Retrieved from https://stanfield.com/avoid-assumptions-teacher/