HBCU Faculty as Instructional Designers: Engaging Pre-Service Counseling Students through Culturally Responsive Content and Context in an Online Course on Multicultural Counseling Competencies.

Concurrent Session 2
Streamed Session HBCU

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Brief Abstract

This presentation will explore how a faculty member of a fully online course develops culturally responsive instructional design of asynchronous and synchronous content within the context of a multicultural counseling class. Implications for engaging pre-service counseling students at an Historically Black College and/or University (HBCU) will be delineated.

Presenters

Dr. Sheila Witherspoon is an Associate Professor in Counselor Education at South Carolina State University in the Department of Human Services. Dr. Witherspoon received her Ph.D. in Counselor Education and Supervision from the University of South Carolina; and her Master of Education and Bachelor of Arts degree from South Carolina State University. She is currently a student in the M.S. Ed. in Instructional Design, with a concentration in Online Learning at Capella University, and has been an online doctoral educator for over 10 years in the areas of counseling, psychology, human services and organizational psychology. Her expertise in higher education in both academic (masters and doctoral) and college student affairs (admissions counselor and recruiter and academic advising) as well as K-12 education (school counseling) spans over 25 years. The qualitative action researcher studies culturally responsive instructional design in online learning - particularly in courses designed to enhance cultural competence through the examination of microaggressions and cultural humility in counseling relationships; and the impact of school climate on school counselor advocacy. She gives back to her community by participating in counseling, education, and civic organizations such as the American Counseling Association, Black Doctoral Network, Inc., Southern Regional Education Board, Association of Counselor Educators and Supervisors, Palmetto State School Counseling Association (South Carolina) New Brunswick Education Foundation (NJ) and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Extended Abstract

Serving as both instructor and instructional designer of a fully online course, the presenter will highlight teaching and learning techniques, as well as instructional design of culturally responsive asynchronous and synchronous content within the context of multicultural counseling competencies and social justice advocacy; particularly as it is developed at an Historically Black College and/or University (HBCU). The course of focus is entitled CED 525 Cross Cultural Considerations in Counseling that is delivered fully online at South Carolina State University’s CACREP approved Counselor Education program.  Evaluated by South Carolina State University’s Center for Online and Distance Education (CODE) based on the Quality Matters (QM) standards, the course received a satisfactory rating, as well as qualified the instructor to teach online.

The faculty member will discuss and illustrate methods for designing and coordinating instructional design based on counseling students’ own experiences with microaggressions, and subsequently develop a virtual training intervention on Padlet to encourage cultural humility among counseling peers who may not understand and/or engage in resistance toward a peer who is detailing these events.  As most students who attend HBCU graduate programs identify as African American and/or Black, there are also students who consider themselves Black that are members of the African diaspora (i.e. from the continent of Africa, African-Caribbean, African-Latinx, etc.); as well as identify as biracial and/or multiracial. Keeping in mind that Whites tend to be the largest minority group at an HBCU, other minority groups (i.e. Asians, Pacific Islanders, Europeans, etc.) may also be present. Thus, content that intersects with spiritual belief systems living with disabilities, sexual orientation, gender roles will also be explored.

Using instructional model ADDIE and the Association of Multicultural Counseling Development’s Multicultural Counseling Competencies and Social Justice Advocacy Competencies, the presenter will examine factors that can contribute to culturally responsive instructional design within the development of asynchronous content, and synchronous facilitation of virtual sessions. Essentially, how does the development of culturally responsive instructional design of asynchronous and synchronous content and context of an online course build cultural competence of pre-service counseling students and help them to encourage cultural humility among future counseling peers, especially as it relates to their personal experiences with microaggressions. 

Using ADDIE and Multicultural Counseling Competencies Social Justice Advocacy Competencies, the objectives of this education session are to illustrate to the audience how to:

  1. Design an asynchronous online learning experience that encourages cultural humility and builds cultural competence.
  2. Plan a synchronous online learning experience that encourages cultural humility and builds cultural competence.
  3. Build a rubric to assess online learning experiences culturally responsive instructional design relative to Quality Matters encourages cultural humility and builds cultural competence.

Proposed session outcomes are:   

  1. To examine the extent to which culturally responsive instructional design of asynchronous content impacts and/or enhances cultural competence and encourages cultural humility.
  2. To examine the extent to which culturally responsive instructional design of synchronous content impacts and/or enhances cultural competence and encourages cultural humility.
  3. To examine the extent to which the development of an evaluative rubric can assess culturally responsive instructional design that encourages cultural humility.